Caucaus Black Tea ?


Please, where in N.A. is possible to buy black tea grown in Caucus region ? Is there an official importer of Caucus Black Tea ? Thank you.
Reply to
Feranija

If you mean Caucasian Mountains (the regions between Black and Caspian sea) tea is grown on both sides, which will be Georgia, Krasnodar Region of Russia and Abkhazia (claimed by Georgia but wants to be with Russia) on the Black sea side and Lenkoran region on Azerbaijan side. These are all distinctively different and interesting teas. As far as I know they are not imported to the US due to the variety of reasons on both sides. I receive these once in a while via friends and family.
Sasha.
P.S. Just brewed myself fresh handmade Abkhazian "Governor of Caucasus". Delicious.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky

Well, on an occasion I drank the tea brought by Russian citizen (I have no idea what side the tea comes from, except it was from Caucus region), and we drunk it from small cups for espresso coffee, as he claimed it's the tradition to drink from small cups, and according to him the tea is very rich with caffein and so we better don't overdo. OK.
The tea was extremely tasty. I tried varieties of Chinese black and green tea, I know Darjaling, Ceylon tea, and Russian Caravan. But, this was something unforgettable, the most pleasant tea I ever tasted.
I found two sites on Internet that sells three varieties of Gruzian tea; for 4oz they ask $5-6. To me, it seems they may be selling low grade Gruzian tea that has nothing in common with the tea I tasted with my Russian friend years ago. Maybe I am wrong. Please advice something.
Thank you.
Reply to
Feranija

For some peculiar reason you insist on misspelling words like Caucasus and make a mulatto word "Gruzian" which is probably a mix of Gruzin (transliteration from Russian word "Georgian") and Armenian. Irrelevant but irritating.
1. Anyway, you most probably talk about Krasnodar region Tea, which, if high quality, can be really unforgettable. It posses a unique, very rich and strong aroma that people remember for a long time. BTW - it is the northernmost tea plantations on the planet. Lenkoran tea could also be unforgettable. Why not asking these guys directly? You are absolutely right in saying that Georgian tea has probably nothing to do with it. Georgian tea is low quality product - was, is and most probably will remain that way until Georgians, who are avid wine drinkers start drinking tea. Georgian tea was produced for Soviet mass market when Georgia was a part of USSR.
2. Unless you know people who live there or who go there on trips, you may not be able to find Krasnodar. There are some sites there that sell this type of tea but I would not recommend them. You may get lucky and you may get unlucky. They also sell by kilos only, AFAIK.
3. Small cups and lotsa coffeine - never heard of it. May be some family folklore.
Sasha.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky

"Alex Chaihorsky" writes:
I've tasted some exceptions to this. There's now small-scale production of high quality tea there. Nigel Melican has consulted with growers there, and his family's company nbtea.co.uk sells some of the results (apparently only white tea right now.)
/Lew
Reply to
Lewis Perin

I looked at these. These are Georgian, not Krasnodar. Also we were talking about robust black teas. If I will have a chance I will try to bring some for you when and if we meet in mid-February in NY.
Sasha.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky

I've seen small cups from Turkey. They were quite small, made from glass and looked a bit like shot glasses. It is not far from Turkey to Caucasus.
/Mårten
Reply to
MÃ¥rten Nilsson

You are talking about armuddy - a crystal or glass glass usually with a "waist", that is used both in Turkey and Azerbaijan to drink tea. The author of the original post is talking about "espresso" cups, that are very different.
Sasha.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky

Lewis snipped-for-privacy@panix1.panix.com11/22/05 14: snipped-for-privacy@panix.com
And, I have drunk said Georgian tea from Nigel's Company, "Nothing but Tea" (nbt), and found it quite nice. I bought it for a person who spent a good deal of time in Cuba where Georgian tea was popular at the time. She thought very highly of Nigel's. The teas in question come from small production areas.
Nigel supports tea production all over the world, especially in regions just now developing (in terms of tea), or in the process of improving viable tea production, such as in Kenya and Georgia. The tea is fully oxidized, and has a taste and style not dissimilar to the best whole leaf teas Bangla Desh has to offer. It is at the moment, as far as I hear and taste, still spotty, but that goes for everywhere, right?
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant

Alex ChaihorskyNeOgf.19488$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com11/22/05 18: snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com
Sasha,
For what it's worth, I've been looking high and low for some armuddies, but find only the heavily decorated ones -- with colored glass here and gold there. I want plain old glass. Any ideas where I might go?
Michael Free Abkhazia NOW!
Reply to
Michael Plant

I have mine brought to me from Baku. I'll try to find some for you at Russki web sites. If not - I'll bring you one of mine (I;ll send you the pic later) to NY in Feb.
Sasha.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky

Alex Chaihorskynq%gf.24534$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net11/23/05 09: snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com
Thanks, Sasha. As well as being excellent drinking vessels, they make remarkably efficient receiving vessels from a gaiwan. Very nice for viewing the tea soup.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant

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