Glenlivet


On 8/15/04 11:02 AM, in article KGMTc.21728651$ snipped-for-privacy@news.easynews.com,
It's not Irish, for one thing. As I recall, it's a middle of the road blended Scotch whisky. Not bad, but not on a par with a good single malt.
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Reply to
Michael P. Thompson

Uzytkownik "Michael P. Thompson" napisal:
Ooops! What is a good single malt, then?
Cheers, Rajmund
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Reply to
Rajmund

Glenlivet is a single-malt Scotch Whisky. The 12 YO is a big seller in the U.S. It is considered a pretty good single-malt whisky but not on par with the best.
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Robert Anderson
Reply to
Robert Anderson

"Michael P. Thompson" skrev i melding news:BF1D1CB9.335E9% snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net... ...
Blended?! The Glenlivet - yes, that's the name - was considered the best single malt a century or two ago. Nowadays the taste has shifted, and a lot of people prefer the rougher malts of the isles. It is still a low-key, delicate but complex malt which invites to slow sipping. Not bad at all when you are in a contemplative mood. :-) Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

It is still one of the best sellers in the U.S. along with Glenfiddich. I understand why Glenlivet sells well as it is an enjoyable dram. Perfect for a summer evening.
But Glenfiddich tastes like lighter fluid or something to me...
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Robert Anderson
Reply to
Robert Anderson

One of my favorites is Connemara, made by the Cooley Distillery in Ireland. It's a bit smoky compared to most Irish whiskies, due to the use of peated malt, which is common in Scotch, but not so in Irish whiskies. See
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Red Breast is also an outstanding whiskey, and among the finest examples of traditional Irish distillation processes. It's pure pot still, and made from both malted and unmalted barley, like a true Irish whiskey.
Kilbeggan, also made by Midleton, is a decent single malt for a fair price, though I like Tyrconnell even better, and it's about the same cost.
I only mention Irish whiskies here, as I was responding to a post on alt.drinks.irish-whiskey, but this is not to disparage the many fine Scotch whiskies I've enjoyed over the years. I'll leave those to others to mention.
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Reply to
Michael P. Thompson

On 8/8/05 2:40 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "Robert
Thanks for enlightening me. I didn't realize it was a single malt.
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Reply to
Michael P. Thompson

it dependes if it is 'The Glenlivet' or just something generally branded as 'glenlivet' which a lot of whiskys are allowed to be called, but there is only one called 'The Glenlivet' the 15 yo french oak reserve is quite nice, im in uk, dont know if it available in the US
Reply to
Doner Kebab

As The Glenlivet was one of the first Malt whiskies to become popular outside Scotland, partly due to a king asking for it once he visited Scotland - Glenlivet became synonymous with Quality
Most Speyside distilleries used to add "glenlivet" to their name on their bottlings. Thats why you see names like
Macallan-Glenlivet Longmorn-Glenlivet,
on older bottlings especially
Originally it was pure marketing to point out here was a whisky as good as the famous Glenlivet
Today thing have changed. Glenlivet is famous but probably not the most famous speysider and it may still be quite a few favourite speysider but not mosts.
So most distilleries dropped the "-glenlivet" on their labels and I think that SWA doesnt allow it anymore with their new labeling rules
If you are looking for a 12y typically Speyside-style whisky that hasnt been "ruined" by sherry I reckon The Glenlivet to be one of the best
MacDeffe
Reply to
Steffen Bräuner

Uzytkownik "Michael P. Thompson" napisal:
Well, I was being rather sarcastic in fact. The Glenlivet is a single malt whisky - as others have already pointed out - and one of the finest at that. Not necessarily the basic official 12yo bottling, but still... Calling it "not bad, but not on a par with a good single malt" makes one chuckle, that's all ;-)
Cheers, Rajmund
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Reply to
Rajmund

You're too kind! Actually, it makes one note the poster's name and file it away in the "ignorant bullshit bin" for future reference. 8;)
-- Larry
Reply to
pltrgyst

Sorry, I guess my sarcasm sensor was out of whack that day. :-)
I was responding to the message on alt.drinks.irish-whiskey, and didn't notice that it was cross-posted to some Scotch whisky groups as well, so at first I thought the author was confused. I now realize it was me who was confused, not realizing that Glenlivet was a single malt.
As for its quality, I guess that's subjective. I haven't tried it myself, but it's rare for my Scotch drinking friends to mention it at all, while I hear about Auchentoshen, Glenmorangie, Balvenie, Macallen, Bowmore, Lagavulin, Laphroig, and the like all the time. I'll tell you what though, I'm off to the pub for a rousing evening of song and drink, and I'll make it a point to try a dram of Glenlivet.
Cheers!
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Reply to
Michael P. Thompson

On 8/9/05 4:35 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,
OK, so now I'm really glad that Rajmund is gracious enough to educate me, instead of reviling me.
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Reply to
Michael P. Thompson

The Glenlivet is an excellent example of a light flowery malt, which is probably why it isn't rated to highly by the devotees of the Islay malts. I rate as pretty good, but not exceptional.
Roger
Reply to
Renko

I think that's a bit of exaggeration to say that most Speyside distilleries used the Glenlivet epithet. I've been drinking the stuff for 35 years and have never seen Glenlivet on Macallan... Certainly Cadenhead bottle their Longmorn as Longhorn-Glenlivet.
AFAIK the only other distilleries to describe themselves today are Tomintoul, Tamnavulin, and Braes of Glenlivet. These distilleries are all in the parish of Glenlivet.
Roger
Reply to
Renko

I of course forgot to add that Cadenhead also bottle a gelnfiddich offering, and call that Glenfiddich-Glenlivet, which is a bit of a geographical nonsense, In fact further research would tend to support the original claim that many Spetsides bore the glenlivet addiiton, but nearly all came from Cadenheads.
Reply to
Renko

U¿ytkownik "Renko" napisa³:
Don't blame Cadenhead for the overuse of the Glenlivet name. They are just being true to the distilleries' original names. As somebody's already pointed out, the word "Glenlivet" at some point was synonymous with "highest quality" in the world of whisky, and a lot of distilleries adopted it, even though they were (and still are, obviously) situated far from the glen of the Livet River. These include Macallan, Glenfiddich (by the very name situated in a rather different glen - glen of the Fiddich), Longmorn (by Elgin, prretty far from the Livet), and many others.
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Reply to
Rajmund

I copied this from scotchwhisky.com : ******************************************* The Longest Glen in Scotland Glenlivet is sometimes referred to as'the Longest Glen' because, until they were constrained, twenty-five distweries adopted the name as a guarantee of quality some of them over thirty miles from Glenlivet itself!
Legal action in 1871 by the owner of the original Glenlivet Distillery, J.G. Smith, established that only his whisky could call itself The Glenlivet, and the others had to use the name as a suffix only (MacallanGlenlivet, Miltonduff-Glenlivet, etc).
These are the distilleries which formerly used the name Glenlivet: Aberlour, Aultmore, Benriach, Benromach, Coleburn, Craigellachie, Dailuaine, Dufftown, Glenburgie, Glendronach, Glendullan, Glen Elgin, Glen Grant, Glenisla, Glen Keith, Glenlossie, Glenmoray, Glen Rothes, Longmorn, Macallan, Miltonduff, Mortlach, Strathisla, Tomatin and Toniintoul.
Only two In truth there is only two distilleries in the glen, apart from The Glenlivet Distillery itself: Braes of Glenlivet and Tamnavulin. The former was only built in 1973, and the latter was mothballed by its owners in 1995.
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I cant understand you havent seen the label Macallan-Glenlivet ?. I have seen it numerous times, especially on GM bottlings. To be honest I cant really think of a bottling more than 15 years old (independent) that didnt have the suffix glenlivet
Reply to
Steffen Bräuner

U¿ytkownik "Renko" napisa³:
Have a look at this photo - that's a disused Convalmore-Glenlivet distillery:
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It says so on the roof ;-) The distillery is located in Dufftown, quite a distance from the glen of the Livet.
More pics here, for those who haven't seen them:
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Cheers, Rajmund
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Reply to
Rajmund

Yes Cadenheads, for their own odd reasons still continue with the Glenlivet-suffix
Almost everybody else or everybody else has stopped. Maybe due to the confusion. Nobody ever claimed that the Glenlivet suffix meant the whisky was from the Glen of Livet
MacDeffe
Reply to
Steffen Bräuner

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