Happy thanksgiving (US), and a courtesy reminder

As a well-known AFW resident busybody, I've periodically taken it upon myself to post courtesy reminders. As the American holiday of Thanksgiving approaches, I thought I'd do once more. The friends I've made here (though some I've never seen!) are one of the things I'm thankful for.
BTW, Some very good info can be found at the group FAQ,
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A few thoughts (mostly derived from previous courtesy posts): 1) This is Usenet , a tool for discussion. Don't expect to post something w/o possibility of someone refuting it. 2) Please keep in mind that many of the contributors to alt.food.wine do not speak English as their first language. Also even for some of us who do, it's easy to mistake the tone of written communication. If there's 2 ways to take a post, be easy on yourself and decide the least offensive perception is the correct one. :) 3) Let's try to avoid personal comments. If you don't like someone, filter their posts. The details of how to do that vary according to newsreader software, but tutorials exist on the Web for employing filters in all the popular newsreaders. 4) If you realize someone's intent is to provoke and annoy (in other words, a troll) , please just ignore. Every time you argue with them, or invoke their name, you're stroking their (IMHO somewhat warped) ego.
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If you feel compelled to respond,I can't stop you. But please don't quote trolls , it puts their words in front of those who have kill-filed them 5)New Folks: you're here to learn, right? So if someone who has been on AFW for years and serious about wine for 30+ corrects you, learn from it, don't get your feelings hurt. 6) Old folks : remember you were new (to wine and AFW) at some point, too. Correct if need be, but let's try to do so graciously. 7) Personally, I find it less than helpful to make generalizations about people based on where they live, what they do outside wine, etc. People who invoke offensive off-topic subjects on a regular basis deserve to be killfiled, period. 8) No one is superior (In My Humble Opinion) based on either the simplicity or elegance of what they eat or drink. Isn't this group big enough for someone to have Shiraz with BBQed chicken and another to have rack of lamb with a fine Pauillac? Does it somehow offend you to read about a meal you wouldn't eat yourself? If someone says that they will not drink certain types of wines, don't waste your time worrying about their opinions of those wines, listen to those that do. 9)Newbies: we welcome your participation (this is speaking as someone who has participated for a few years, I'm neither a true old-timer or a newbie). But as in ANY social situation, whether on or off line, it is wisest not to attack a respected member of a community while a newbie, it really won't win you any points. It is a time-honored tradition that one should lurk for a while before posting to get a feel re tone of a group. 10)Most of the people here use their real names Some use a pseudonym, but do include a valid email address. As to others, I personally don't feel that it's wise to put too much energy into conversations with those who are unaccountable and unreachable. As they say,YMMV. So there. As usual, I'm sure I've offended a couple of old-timers and a couple of newbies, but hope the rest of you can take these remarks to heart. I don't claim to be immune to digression (I remember ruefully the "collectors recork wine every 10years/chianti cannot be drunk young/Europeans are all wine sophisticates" guy. I got a little over-involved;sorry!);all I'm asking is that we try to keep these guidelines in mind.
best wishes,
Dale
Dale
Dale Williams Drop "damnspam" to reply
Reply to
Dale Williams

Dale, you #$&(*$(&&*ing $(&(*#$&(*%, may you burn in *&%^&*%&^%^!!!!! :P
p.s. Have a great Turkey Day! I hope to read about the feast when I get back from our Thanksgiving excursion.
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton
Turkey would be better if it tasted more like Duck.
This year we are doing a Fondue for Thanksgiving of Tenderlon and my wife will make some fun sauces in including bearnaise, mustard-horseradish...and few others...
Life is to short to year Turkey and I have seen a Turkey processing plant....never AGAIN.
Reply to
Richard Neidich

Whatever he said....
Happy Thanksgiving. Only Monday and SWMBO is adrift in la cocina, getting increasingly frantic and issuing random demands for unusual ingredients....
Two bottles of a nice Mosel-Saar Ruwer Spatlese, two of a Rheingau Spatlese and two Schug Carneros PN added to the stock in anticipation of Thursday.
(Why is it with several hundred bottles in the basement, I go out and buy wine for the dinner??? What's wrong with this picture???)
Ed Rasimus Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret) "When Thunder Rolled" www.thunderchief.org
Reply to
Ed Rasimus

LOL!! Because you don't want to waste your precious Ridge Zins on the impossible collection of foods that grace most Thanksgiving tables, Ed???
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton
Wine is to be consummed, and I've got few bottles that are "off-limits". Still, it seems that nothing in the cellar seems to be appropriate. The incredible conflict is the desire on one hand to enhance the meal which comes as a result of significant effort while at the other hand minimizing the "pearls before swine" syndrome of seeing a few folks who don't make much distinction about what is placed before them swill the good stuff without much appreciation.
Before someone chastizes me for crass elitism, let me state that the friends who share my holiday table are highly valued and that I inevitably lean toward the better bottles and the hope that maybe a discussion of what we might be enjoying will blossom into greater enjoyment.
Still, for the "impossible collection" of foods, I don't think the Italians which seem to be the latest tilt of my cellar, nor the Ridge zins (or their new co-tenants of the basement, the Renwood Amador County zins), or the gradually growing Bordeaux samplings which need a couple of years, nor anything else (particularly not the Monte Bello vertical I've been nurturing) seem appropriate.
I've always liked Schug PN and the two spatleses will satisfy those who insist that white goes with poultry. Rheingau has always been may favorite German and the Mosel will offer a bit of contrast and a lighter taste.
Ed Rasimus Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret) "When Thunder Rolled" www.thunderchief.org
Reply to
Ed Rasimus
Ed, I totally sympathize. I have 600 bottles, and at least once a week I realize I don't have what I want for that dinner! Good excuse for shopping. :) Dale
Dale Williams Drop "damnspam" to reply
Reply to
Dale Williams
Robert, that's one solution! Another is to get a heritage turkey (though it takes advance planning!).
cheers,
Dale
Dale Williams Drop "damnspam" to reply
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Dale Williams
Dale that must be a common problem. The more bottles that I have on hand, the more often I have to shop for the "right" wine. Bill
Reply to
Pantheras
On 22 Nov 2004 23:08:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comdamnspam (Dale Williams) said:
] > ] >>Turkey would be better if it tasted more like Duck. ] > ] >Which is why I am serving roast duck this year, ] ] Robert, that's one solution! Another is to get a heritage turkey (though it ] takes advance planning!). ]
Thanks for the reminder, Dale. I was speculating how long it would take before you stuck your oar in! :)
Happy thanksgiving to all. Just spoke to the bird farmer, ours is ready to pick up tomorrow. BTW, what's a "heritage turkey?" No antibiotics or hormones? Or one from here in France? :)
I haven't yet solved the wine conundrum for this year. Probably won't until thursday morning when a decision is forced upon me...
-E
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Emery Davis
You can reply to emeryamazon@ebayadelka.com
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Reply to
Emery Davis
Heritage turkey is a marketing term circulated these days for a variety of "heirloom" breeds which are raised in an enviroment that allows at least some foraging . Bourbon Reds & Naragansetts are 2 of the most popular. Tend to have much smaller breasts than whatever breed the butterball ones are, but far more flavor .
Best to you and Adele! Dale
Dale Williams Drop "damnspam" to reply
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Dale Williams
That is always a problem I have as well. Despite a large collection I always go out for wines for Thanksgiving. Will be having something for everyone. Domaine Faurmarie Coteaux du Languedoc 2002, Robertson Springfield Estate 2002 Chardonnay (South Africa) that has some extremely unusual an interesting tastes to it (somewhat nutty and spicy), and Domaine Carneros Brut Rose 2001. Hopefully, I've covered all bases. Probably could use a couple of bottles of Rheingau as we have 12 people.
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman
Did a Turducken last year for a Cajun Thanksgiving. Did not go over well with a diverse crowd who expect traditional but I loved it.
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman

For the record, I post under a pseudonym for professional reasons. I don't want my activities here to influence my (wine-related) job responsibilities, or vice versa. But the e-mail address I use here is a valid one. Anyone who has followed my postings knows that I live in the Seattle area and recently had the pleasure of hosting Ian and Jacquie Hoare while they were in this area. I admit to a certain partiality toward Columbia Valley wines but by no means am I going to insist that they are uniformly better than wines from anywhere else. Anyone who has the opportunity to visit the Seattle area should feel free to contact me via e-mail and I'll do what I can to make your visit here enjoyable.
Vino
Reply to
Vino

Yup. I know the problem well. Some of our most cherished friends will happily drink anything that's put in front of them and don't want to spend any time analyzing the wine. I don't mind serving them bottles that I treasure, but I'm not very motivated to pull a special bottle out just for them. OTOH, like you I never give up trying to spark that special, "aha" feeling in them either. You never know what might spark that extra interest...
No indeed. Simple roast turkey is a good red wine meat, and some stuffings will be fine, too. However, gravy, cranberry sauce and sweet potatoes are no friend of most red wines IMO. And then there are the various extras such as creamed onions, boiled turnips, etc. that only complicate things.
Yup. PN and Riesling seem to be the hands-down favorites for this meal.
Enjoy! Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton

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