Re: Chill Gamay Beaujolais?

I would say that it depended on style and age. I would not chill a good old Morgon or Moulin, I would be more inclined to serve a young simple AoC Beaujolais at cellar temperature and perhaps a Chiroubles or young Fleurie. However even some of the southern Beaujolais - from around Bois d‘Oingt and Theizé can age well and would be better at cool room temerature than chilled, in my view.
Timothy Hartle
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Timothy Hartley
Salut/Hi Foxsrus1,
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I'm somewhat at a loss to work out what wine you're talking about. All red Beaujolais is made from the Gamay grape.
Anyway, many Beaujolais seem to work well at cellar temperature - say 45 to 50F. I'd not freeze its poor socks off, by the way, cool, not icy is the order of the day. If you have a top Beaujolais Cru such as Moulin à Vent or a Morgon with some age (yes, Cru Beaujolais DO age well, becoming more and more Burgundian as they age) then you should serve it at "room temperature" but that's not an over central heated room at 85 or 90Fm, it's the room temperature in a large house in the "good old days", say 62-65F
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All the Best
Ian Hoare
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Ian Hoare
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I had assumed the poster was distinguishing between red Beaujolais and the white and rosé which is sometimes seen - and which can be quite drinkable. Otherwise I agree with Ian as is apparent from my post. Timothy Hartley
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Timothy Hartley

temperature"
Hello, Ian - Brrr! Those "good old days" were too cold for me! :^) Any time it dips below 70°F I get chilly.
As an aside: although I like warm weather, it's been a bit too much of a good thing lately here. I've taken to keeping the opened bottle of Port in the 'fridge.
Tom S
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Tom S
Ian, Though the headers don't reveal a location, I'll hazard a guess that the OP is from the US, where light-bodied red wines are produced with "Gamay Beaujolais" on the label. The grape used is NOT true Gamay (though originally thought to be Gamay) but a clone of Pinot Noir, which may help explain why Europeans would not be familiar with it... FWIW, the name will cease to be legally used in 2007:
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Mark Lipton
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Mark Lipton
In article , snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...
First, may Ivan go someplace ELSE!
Second, if I recall correctly, the term "Gamay Beaujolais" will soon be phased out of US wine lingo, along with "Johannisberg Riesling." There were several C Coast CA producers, who called their grape Gamay Beaujolais, but I have not seen it in a while. As I recall the few (J Lohr comes to mind), they were light, Noveaux Beaujolais in style, and if this is the wine, I would chill it even below cellar temp.
Those few that I tasted, were very floral, with light strawberry fruit, and good for picnic wines, if one did not have a Tavel.
Hunt
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Hunt
Hunt sez:
Shoot, you guys (and the US gummint) have blown my cover!!!!
'Gamay Beaujolais' , in California, has for 30 years been known by experts as a lighter clone of Pinot Noir----but NOT for the rest of der vein-drinkin' population!
For many years, when I was a California winemaker, I cherished the thought of coming home from the supermarket with an interesting, but cheap, "burgundy".
I'm not talking about nouveau, carbonic macerated Gamay---with its unctious strawberry aromas and popcicle flavors.
That's France and bicyclettes, and helicopters in November---and gratefully, that 1980s custom is dead. But I once used it as a foil for purchasing California Gamay Beaujolais, PRECISELY because other customers thought it was the wrong thing.
We're talking about Gamay Beaujolais, a clone of Pinot Noir, which is made into a "straight" wine, albeit light.
California 'Gamay Beaujolias', when it's bad, is just bad wine. But when it's good---REALLY good, as in the old days of Beaulieu Napa Valley Gamay Beaujolais, in the 1980s---it resembled a poor man's Volnay, or Monthelie, but at $3. ! ! !
I regret and resent that this "winemakers' secret" is now being dissected and put to rest.
Even some of the the current versions of Gamay Beaujolais, from mass producers, can be delightful, in the context of a light French Burgundy.
So what's going on in this world? Is the Pinot Noir world now forced to emulate bold and tannic Chambertin (at consequent prices)?
Why can't we have a cheap, light Pinot Noir for quaffing?
--Bob
Reply to
RobertsonChai
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You can if you go to Northern Burgundy - ther‘s a lot around Auxerre, unless it‘s been ”improved• with Cesar.
Timothy Hartley
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Timothy Hartley
Just as a footnote does this discussion about the meaning of Beaujolais Gamay prove the old saw about a people divided by a common langauge?
Timothy Hartley
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Timothy Hartley

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