TN: Chablis, Pomerol, Bourgueil


Before I went to Tuscan tasting Friday (separate notes), I had dinner at home- leftover chicken bouillabaisse. I opened the 2005 Vincent Mothe Chablis AC. Had bought this on rec of a good friend who works at a good store. He had said more Cote d'Or than Chablis. He's right. Big ripe pear fruit, a bit of earth, some light vanilla. Next night it was still young, fresh, and fruit driven. This is a big fruit forward Chardonnay, pretty decent in that light, but not what I want in Chablis. If I didn't already have a bunch of Pernot/Matrot Bourgogne blancs I might think about getting some, but I pass on more. B
Saturday I took an experimental walk with Lucy (she had minor surgery Th, can't wear collar, so used her harness) across town to retrieve my car. Then took her to Newark airport to greet David as he arrived home for spring break (Basset hounds are very popular at airports). Betsy was working double, I braised a small chuck roast in wine and lamb stock. Wine was the 2005 Christian Moueix Pomerol. Plummy fruit, some currant, just a little graphite. Mild tannins, decent length. Does taste like Pomerol. Good for negoce Pomerol. B
David has said that he doesn't get much good Asian food in Scotland. So tonight Betsy (with Dave's help) made jantaboon (stir fried beef with fresh rice noodles) and kanah namman hoi (Chinese broccoli with mushrooms, Betsy used white beech mushrooms). I opened the 2006 Catherine & Pierre Breton "Trinch!" Bourgueil.  Whoo hoo. My favorite version of this to date. Black cherries and berrries, a little woodbark, some tobacco and spice. This is ripe but with good acidity. Good length, food-friendly, juicy and slurpable. Great for what it is., this is definitely a buy more. B++
Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.
Reply to
DaleW

Chicken bouillabaise? Whassat?
Good to hear about the '06 Trinch! We quite liked the '05 around here, so if the '06 proves to be even better, it'll be quite a hit. The dishes that Betsy made are Vietnamese?
Thanks for the interesting notes.
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton

Sorry, I usually put in quotation marks. It's a recipe for a Provencal fricassee with fennel and Pernod, accompanined by aioli. Judy Rodgers also has a recipe for "Chicken bouillabaise", though hers doesn't use the Pernod
Really liked the "Trinch!" . Deserves the exclamation point this year. I believe both dishes are Thai, but will check.
Reply to
DaleW

The kanah namman hoi is listed as Thai. From "Savoring Southeast Asia" by Joyce Jue. Chinese broccoli and mushrooms (called for straw,but she saw some gorgeous white beech mushrooms). With chiles, garlic, fish sauce, and oyster sauce (though last sounds more Cantonese to me- do Thais use oyster sauce?).
A bit OT for the cooks: do most people who cook just keep one type of fish sauce? We tend to buy nuoc mam (Vietnamese) if at Chinese grocery, nam pla if at little Thai store. Use interchangably. Does anyone think its neccessary to stock both?
Reply to
DaleW

Hi Dale,
On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 08:43:32 -0700 (PDT), DaleW wrote:
Yes. I usually go for a thai one based on shrimps, which I get at a Chinese supermarket in South London.
Nope, absolutely not. -- All the best Fatty from Forges
Reply to
munged

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.