US labeling laws Champagne anomaly re. large bottles?


The US Code of Federal Regulation [27 CFR 4.21(b)(2)] seems to define what bottles may be labeled as "Champagne" as follows:
"Champagne is a type of sparkling light wine which derives its effervescence solely from the secondary fermentation of the wine within glass containers of not greater than one gallon capacity, and which possesses the taste, aroma, and other characteristics attributed to champagne as made in the champagne district of France."
Does this mean that large bottles made in Champagne using the traditional method *cannot* be labeled "Champagne" in the US?
Conversely, note that *transfer* method products apparently *can* be labeled "Champagne", since they fit the definition.
What gives?
FYI, you can search the US CFR here
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Reply to
Leo Bueno
I just saw an ad for Korbel and they touted it as California Champagne. I thought that France had fought that sort of thing.
> The US Code of Federal Regulation [27 CFR 4.21(b)(2)] seems to define > what bottles may be labeled as "Champagne" as follows: > > "Champagne is a type of sparkling light wine which derives its > effervescence solely from the secondary fermentation of the wine > within glass containers of not greater than one gallon capacity, and > which possesses the taste, aroma, and other characteristics attributed > to champagne as made in the champagne district of France." > > Does this mean that large bottles made in Champagne using the > traditional method *cannot* be labeled "Champagne" in the US? > > Conversely, note that *transfer* method products apparently *can* be > labeled "Champagne", since they fit the definition. > > What gives? > > FYI, you can search the US CFR here >
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> > -- > ================================================= > Do you like wine? Do you live in South Florida? > Visit the MIAMI WINE TASTERS group at >
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> =================================================
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman

Here in Australia it has been a number of years since we've been able to use many terms such as "champagne". And others are being phased out.
It is called "sparkling" if it is not produced in France, I think it even has to be produced by one of the ~40 000 producers in Champagne to be called Champagne.
Reply to
Mat
They do...but the US never subscribed to the treaty for that as we were in prohibition. Therefore legally we are not required to.
Also the EU lost a recent lawsuit in the WTO to protect geographical names.
Personally I feel this was a bad ruling. But it is ruled on and Canada can go on producing local parma ham
Reply to
Richard Neidich

I don't quite get what you want to say, but according to Frech (and EU) regulations, to be called "Champagne", the growing of the grapes, the vinification, the second fermentation and the final make-up have to happen within the legal boundaries of the "Champagne viticole" area. There is no bulk wine shipping outside, for the simple reason that champagne grape prices are just about the highest in the world.
Just for the matter of records: You can buy slightly fortified (16%abv) base wines from the Charente in bulk to distill it into Brandy, but of course you are not entitled to call it "Cognac", even if the base wines come from the right origin.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
So, how is Korbel getting away with running these TV spots?
> > > It is called "sparkling" if it is not produced in France, I > > think it even has to be produced by one of the ~40 000 producers > > in Champagne to be called Champagne. > > I don't quite get what you want to say, but according to Frech > (and EU) regulations, to be called "Champagne", the growing of the > grapes, the vinification, the second fermentation and the final > make-up have to happen within the legal boundaries of the > "Champagne viticole" area. There is no bulk wine shipping outside, > for the simple reason that champagne grape prices are just about > the highest in the world. > > Just for the matter of records: You can buy slightly fortified > (16%abv) base wines from the Charente in bulk to distill it into > Brandy, but of course you are not entitled to call it "Cognac", > even if the base wines come from the right origin. > > M.
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman

Really? I'm not saying it isn't true - I just find it hard to believe, Michael. Can you give an idea how high that would be?
Just off the top of my head, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon was selling for ~$5K/ton this year. Of course that wouldn't be from a prestigious vineyard
Naturally this will involve another exercise in metric units and currency conversion. ;^)
Tom S
Reply to
Tom S
In news: snipped-for-privacy@pronay.com, Michael Pronay typed:
One ton is 2000 pounds, or 1016.064 KG.
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Ken Blake
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Reply to
Ken Blake
In news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, Ken Blake typed:
Sorry, wrong ton. One US ton (the kind used in the Napa Valley) is 907.2 KG.
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Ken Blake
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Reply to
Ken Blake

I'm very sorry to agree with you. The EU governors are ridiculous, one should be totally fool to believe these are simply "errors": this is corruption. They act as (dirty) money wants. Just think of this one: the President of EU is born in my same town, 30 kilometers from Parma, and perfectly knows Parma ham and how harmful that lawsuit has been for Parma ham. Now his EU is selling out the DOC and DOCG names so we'll finally have Barolo from australia and Brunello from Chile, and tomorrow? Only God knows what they'll be selling off. I understand why UK and others are still out of the EU.
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  Vilco
Think Pink , Drink Rose'
Reply to
Vilco

What?!
There is no "President of the EU".
Jose Manuel Barroso, the President of the European Commission, is born in Lisbon, Portugal. Thanks for your perfect enlightenment in European geography.
I guess you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Nobody is selling anything off.
The United Kingdom ist member of the EU (formerly known as EEC) for over 30 years. UK joined January 1st, 1973.
Go home and have your homework done.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
"Michael Pronay"
OK, let's add the words "FORMER" and "of the ... commissione" to what I wrote.
So what does mean for you "parma ham made in Canada"? Is this defending or selling out?
OK, let's pinpoint it all: they keep out of the monetary union.
Sure, sir...
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  Vilco
Think Pink , Drink Rose'
Reply to
Vilco
Oh, I was forgetting one thing: I can't wait to drink my first Amarone and Barolo from out of Italy...
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  Vilco
Think Pink , Drink Rose'
Reply to
Vilco

The EU *lost* the case at WTO trying to *defend* Parma ham by trying to ban Canadians to use this designation. EU did not "sell out" anything.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
My personal opinion is that is a bad deal. Poor Ruling.
In some cases where tradition has 100+ years the products/geography should have been protected. Even here in the USA we protect geography. Example:
1) To be Called Florida Orange Juice the product has to be from Florida 2) Same of California Naval Oranges 3) Virginia Peanuts---from Va.
I think on those products native of certain land we should have the law be respectful of those aspects and protect geographical names that have existed for over 100 years.
Reply to
Richard Neidich

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