Layering and grafting


I've got a question that the early Texas hill country spring inspires. I plan to start some of the wild mustang grapes out here this season by layering. It's clearly adapted to the soil conditions, climate, and so forth and thus I presume would make a good root to graft something more wine friendly onto.
My question is why are graft unions made just a few inches from the soil? I'd like to make the graft up near the grape growing portion of the vine, approximately six feet above the soil. It might be interesting to graft both a white and a red to each vine as well.
The advantage to me is that the deer out here have voracious appetites. I'd like to see my vines survive them before I go to the effort of grafting. Further, the six foot height should move the grapes up out of their eating range, at least I hope it does. What are the issues with a high graft?
Thanks, Chris
Reply to
Chris

Yes, you can do that. Some vineyards convert from one type to another in this way. I do not know, however, the compatibility issues or if there are any with mustang and other varieties.
Reply to
Paul E. Lehmann

Thanks
I have a huge wild grape in the back of my property. I've begun layering some of it's canes. As a back up I've planted seed that I harvested from last season. I rather suspect that the layering approach will yield the better result.
The deer are so hungry this winter that they're eating the seed that the birds kick out of their feeder. I don't want to train the deer to my yard so I don't intentionally feed them but on the other hand I don't think the scraps I add to my compost pile last very long.
Chris
Reply to
Chris

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