Beer & lemon?!?!?!

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I was at a bar in Portland the other night and noticed a few people
drinking beer with a lemon in it? What's up with that? Is it a certain
kind of beer or is it just a regional fad?Who makes it and what's it
like?


Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!


wrote:

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Well, lately it's been stylish to drink Corona with lemon--possibly to
give it some kind of a taste!

I've also seen people serving wheat beers with lemon.  Some of them
have a lemony flavor anyway.

Dav Vandenbroucke
davanden at cox dot net

Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!



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It has been stylish in Portland to drink Widmer Hefeweizen with a lemon in
it for the last 15 years or so.  I believe Widmer was the first American
Hefeweizen to make it big and probably still the best-selling micro in
Portland.  Try one if you get a chance.  You can also go to the source, the
Widmer brewing company, about a mile south of the Rose Garden/Coliseum.




Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!



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I've never seen Corona with lemon. I've seen it with lime for a good 15
years now.

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It's gotten pretty common to serve hefeweizen, particulary the American
variety (such as brewed by Widmer or Pyramid), with lemon. In recent years,
I've seen some bars serve German-style hefes with lemon as well, which as
far as I'm concerned is completely wrong. I've never seen Bavaraian
hefeweizen served with lemon, or any other fruit, in Bavaria.

-Steve



Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!


Steve Jackson wrote:
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There used to be a small bar in NJ, 30+ years ago, that had about 6-8
imports on tap (an *amazing* selection for the era upon first glancing
at the number of taps, 'cept, once a survey was made, I would have
preferred some UK offerings, it was all Germans, light and dark, plus
Heineken).

They were well known for serving 500 ml bottled weiss & hefe's (brand
long forgotten) in those big (and downright clumsy at a bar) 1/2 liter
weiss glasses, complete with lemon.  I thought it was strange and always
had to ask (usually twice) for no lemon, which they thought strange-
they made a big show out of cutting the lemon, rubbing it 'round the
lip, squeezing the lemon into the glass, etc), even tho' they DID make a
big point of asking if you wanted the yeast poured in or not.

The drunks at the bar, however, seemed to like to watch the lemon pits
slowly rise and sink in glass of beer and I decided that was the main
purpose of the lemon- to keep the drunks quiet & entertained.


Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!


...
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I certainly have.  Where, though, I can't recall; probably in
Baden Württemberg at modern brewpubs.  Not that I can recall
at all in Barvaria.  Oh, that's what you said.  Yeah, never mind.


Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!


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A common practice here in the US and sometimes in Europe.  

http://www.germanbeerguide.co.uk/hefeweiz.html
I used to put lemon in wheat beers, but no more.  I've discovered some
beers don't need it, being quite citrusy by themselves.  Lemon and
grapefruit flavors can often be quite pronounced in American ales and
IPA's due to different yeast and hop combinations.  There are others,
like Belgian white beers, that actually add dried organge peel.


nb

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Jackal wrote:
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Lemon with beer is quite common, especially with something like a
Paulaner.  It's quite refreshing in the summer (and fall and spring).


Re: Beer & lemon?!?!?!


wrote:

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In Germany, many bar patrons will drop a lemon wheel into a glass of
krystalweissebier, but not hefe-weizen.  The pop trend to jam a lime
into a bottle of Corona Extra is carrying over to all Mexican beers
now.  

So, Mex. Restaurant bartenders, please don't swuish a lime into my
Modelo Especial or my Dos Equios Dark.  Thanks in Advance.


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