Guinness turns red in beer trial

It ruddy (geddit?) well wouldn't have if they'd kept to the recipe they used to use some 30 odd years ago.
Reply to
KeithS
In message , Mike Roebuck wrote
And they said that Watneys Red Barrel would never return!
Reply to
Alan
The Irish guinness "with the red hue" is a pale shadow of the stuff I drank many years ago. More dumbing down then. And interestingly they are also apparently trialling a "mid strength" (sic) version in Irish pubs. The ABV? 2.8%! Greede King "IPA" come back, all is forgiven. :-)
Reply to
BrianW
In article ,
We noticed the pale version of Guinness about a year ago, when our tame Rastaman (who drinks Guinness because it is black!) went barmy because he could see through the stuff! We all agreed it was definitely not the usual black stuff, and he hasn't been back in the club since.
Reply to
Christine
wrote
This topic has reminded me I first tasted Guinness in Dublin 50 years ago. We tried the various varieties in the brewery & were not too impressed. One Guinness variety I do remember was on sale in Dublin bars & was a cheaper variety on handpump. When it was pulled it came with a thick scummy head that had to be scraped off several times with a scraper & the final fill came from a small cask at the back of the bar Can anyone remember the name of this variety?.
Reply to
Dave Croft
It is interesting to note than in the various "trial" and occasional brews they haven't thought to bring back a real rich roasty, black, bitter stout like they used to have (called Guinness) years ago.
Removing the hops and roast makes it a bit like Caffrey's or other such muck. They ought to look backwards for success I think.
An unpasteurised version would be nice, but probably impractical given their distribution methods.
Forecast? It won't take off. The reason I drink Guinness now and then is when I can't get cask beer. Bit of an untapped market there I think. Peter
Reply to
Peter Alexander
How would you tell the difference? Apart from which sewer rats started putting out begging bowls and "recently unemployed" signs.
Reply to
Steven Pampling
In article , snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net says...
I heard a rumour (from someone who worked at the Park Royal brewery before they closed it) that all Guinness is now brewed at the low gravity and then boosted up using the alcohol removed from Kaliber.
M
Reply to
Martin
That would make no sense whatever. High gravity and watering down possibly but the reverse? Never in a million years.
IMO
Peter
Reply to
Peter Alexander
In article ,
I don't think it's possible either! Probably one of those draymen's tales.
Reply to
Christine
In message , Christine writes
I think it's possible but wouldn't be economic.
The alcohol is removed from non-alcoholic "beer" by forcing it under physical pressure through a semipermeable membrane. That would extract the alcohol at a fairly high concentration, but it would be impure: in particular, any methanol that was present would be extracted with it. In that state it'd taste nasty and might be unsafe for food use, while if purified it would be worth more as vodka.
Reply to
MadCow

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