Tried Pu-er - didn't like it much

Ok, from everything I've read, I thought Pu-er sounded like an interesting tea. I was near a Teavana so I had them make me a cup.
Oh, my. I did NOT like it.
I assume it's an acquired taste? The after taste lasted for HOURS. Anyone like the tea the first time around?
Cathy Weeks
Reply to
Cathy Weeks

I did, when I tried it a few weeks ago. But then I was expecting it to taste weird, after hearing about it for years. Plus it was some good stuff.
With any acquired taste, like lapsang souchong, it depends on how persistent you are, and how willing you are to be persistent about something like tea. :-)
Ian
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Reply to
Ian Rastall
I liked Pu-Erh the first time I tried it, and if that specific type tastes that bad to you I wouldn't try to acquire a taste for it! Before giving up on it, though, maybe you should try other Pu-Erh's? Maybe you just didn't care for that specific Pu-Erh, or maybe you'd hate them all, who knows?
Reply to
josh.efaw

Tried it, didn't like it. Tried it repeatedly, and different variations. Never developed a "taste" for it.
Every cup tasted the way my mouth did after spending a day mucking out horse stables. Perhaps if I didn't have that memory, I could learn to like it. As it is, the taste of stall dust is NOT a pleasing memory.
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Derek

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Reply to
Derek
I did not like it the first or second time.. Some things to suggest:
1) Rinse the puerh for 30 seconds and throw away that initial steeping. 2) Try a Green pu-erh.
For me, a switch just clicked and I began to kindof like it.. Although that initial SpecialTeas Tuo Cha still kinda tasted bad until the 2nd or 3rd steep.
Reply to
Steve Hay

I would say it depends on the quality of the stuff you got and the type. Was it the sheng (green) or the shu (cooked/fried/whatever) and how old was it? Some people prefer the taste of the cooked version better than the green version.
Some of the newer stuff (less than 5 years) tastes horrid. Most people recommended to me that you should try to score stuff that was at least 5 years before even thinking about trying it.
There again, I did some gongfu cha with pu'er for my mom when she visited and she hated it but my brother loved it. I say keep up with it though. I didn't like it as well at first, but after I got some good quality stuff and after someone showed me how to brew it correctly, I found it to be one of the most rewarding tea experiences I can recall. It can be really smooth like a fine coffee if you can get some good stuff!
Mydnight
-------------------- thus then i turn me from my countries light, to dwell in the solemn shades of an endless night.
Reply to
Mydnight
Hi Cathy,
It may be that you won't ever like Puer. That's fine - after years of trying, I've concluded I just don't like green teas, wherever they're from (of course, they're also not nearly as good as good Puer...).
However....
Trying Puer in most USA tea rooms, probably especially non-Asian chain tea rooms like Teavana is, let us say, probably not the best way to experience the tea. Puer isn't like the black teas that tea rooms like this mostly serve. I suspect the people working there never even heard of Puer before they worked there, and if this is, as it appears to be, Teavana's only Puer, their tea buyers probably would barely know a Puer if it came up and kicked them in the head. Most tea rooms (and restaurants) I've been in can't steep and serve English Breakfast correctly, much less something at all exotic.
I see only one Puer at Teavana:
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; it is, virtually for sure, a "black" or "cooked" or "ripe" Puer (those all mean the same thing); it's also $9.00 a quarter lb., which for me put's it in the "low-grade, too cheap to mess with" category (though others here will disagree). If this is the one you had, that's another reason to go someplace else (though if you're in Atlanta, there probably isn't anywhere better to go); better: get a few samples from a good dealer and try making it yourself. There are plenty of knowledgeable people on this group who would be willing to advise you.
There are tea dealers who care about Puer, and there are dealers who don't. A dealer or tea room that carries one or maybe two low-grade Puers doesn't care about Puer. From the evidence I see, Teavana is in the "don't" category.
A few months ago in a previous Puer thread, I posted this:
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,7ad477bb80fbba27,97ff69eed9d0b675,123efdda21ee9998,676631b81903617a,767c348a28308e0d,e7e3cf7e23bcd802,6a012b6cbb3f15bf,c2367dc622128bbb,74f44d9caeb27b43?thread_id=951d0408d3b080f1&mode=thread&noheader=1&q=doug+hazen,+Jr.+group:rec.food.drink.tea#doc_123efdda21ee9998
which you may or may not find useful. I won't repeat what I said there, but I still stand by it.
Doug
Reply to
Doug Hazen, Jr.
A couple of years ago I knew nothing about puerh and my first trials of it were definitely not appealing. It was the cooked variety, but I realized that, in a weaker version, I'd been served it from time to time in Chinese restaurants.
Through acquaintance with several members of this newsgroup, I was introduced to better quality puerh, particularly the "green" puerh. which I find far more intriguing and rewarding.
I'm in. I've bought a yixing pot specifically for puerh, and have several varieties at hand. For me, a good green puerh (and both young and old can be good) is a real pleasure.
Yes, it can be an acquired taste, but if you have the good stuff, it's not a hard taste to acquire. For me, it's still not a tea I reach for on a daily basis, but it's often "just the thing."
Joe K
Reply to
Joseph Kubera

"Cathy Weeks" wrote in message
I immediatly hate the first horrid puer I have drunk (tasted like dirty mud)and immediatly loved the first good one (aged leaves bought in Hong-Kong).
For the horrid muddy version certainly. Well, you may never like puer, but don't make the mistake of concluding after drinking only one.
Kuri
Reply to
kuri

Same here - I tried Pu Erh about 1 year ago, and didn't like it very much. Back then we just put boiling water over the loose tea leaves.
Ater I read so much about Pu Erh in this NG I decided to give it a 2nd try. I just stumbled over it, not in a teashop though, but in a local imported goods shop. I got a kind of pressed 'teaball', about 1,5 cm in diameter...well...not really a ball, but pressed and small, though ^-^ Anyone knows what this is? Is that one of the 'cakes' read aout?
I rinsed it two times with boiling water, and then infused for only 30 seconds (also with boiling water). That way the infusion lost a lot of the earthy taste that I didn't like on my first Pu Erh experience, but there was still enough earthiness to make it interesting.
now I'll try to go for green Pu Erh, should be excitig.
ciao Patrick
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The truth, as always, will be far stranger"
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Reply to
Patrick Heinze
If a pu-erh made in any tearoom by any "master" from anything called "puerh" would be immediately loved by everyone, it would not be a fine, elusive, complex drink that we love so much (those of us who do). The best way I know is to be introduced to puerh by a master who knows not only puerh, but also a gentle way of introducing it. I highly recommend Roy Fong from ITC. Call him in advance, tell him you want an introduction to puerhs. I wish I would have done that myself.
There are thousands of different puerhs and ways of making it. Just do not be quick to make conclusions.
Sasha.
Reply to
Alex Chaihorsky
Cathy snipped-for-privacy@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com12/6/04 20: snipped-for-privacy@weeksfamily.net
Cathy,
Yup, loved it the first time round. But, do not give up. Actually, Pu'erh is many tastes, and it is still possible to find one just right for you. In the most general sense, we have "cooked" Pu'erhs that taste of the loam of the earth, young "uncooked" ones that often taste of flowers with a certain delightful mustiness, and finally the old "uncooked" ones that cost an arm and a leg, and some believe are worth every digit.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
It's called Xiao Tuo Cha, small(mini) bowl tea. Puerh can come loose, or compressed as Tuo ('birdsnest') or beeng('pancakes'). The mini tuocha is about 10g, tuocha 100g, and beeng 300g+. The Xiao is good for a pot. The other two you have to crumble.
Jim
Reply to
Space Cowboy
Patrick Heinze writes:
No, cakes (bingcha/beengcha/beencha) are more or less flat discs, though they're much thicker than e.g. a DVD. What you have is a tuancha.
/Lew
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Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
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Reply to
Lewis Perin
"Space Cowboy" writes:
Tuochas are bowl-shaped, not ball-shaped. Can the original poster clarify this?
/Lew
--
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Reply to
Lewis Perin
The Puerh that I tried at Teavana was loose, and very black looking. They said that it was aged for 15 years.
Cathy Weeks
Reply to
Cathy Weeks
Cheap Pu Erh tastes like horse piss. Or, in deference to accuracy and proper English (I think), it tastes like horse piss smells. Or is it "as"? Will any of you non-native English speakers, who seem to be the only ones who know the rules of grammar these days, correct me if necessary?
I will drink cheap tea of almost any variety as long as it is fresh, made properly, and is real tea. But not pu erh. Right now I'm drinking "Fu Fang Cha" sent me by a friend. It is pu erh and I think translates to "lucky square tea". It's cuboid, more precisely.
Best,
Rick. > Every cup tasted the way my mouth did after spending a day mucking out > horse stables. Perhaps if I didn't have that memory, I could learn to > like it. As it is, the taste of stall dust is NOT a pleasing memory.
Reply to
Rick Chappell

In my experience, the value of the Pu Erh has little to do with how it prompts my memory. It's all varying degrees of the same thing.
--
Derek

Hard work often pays off after time, but laziness always pays off now.
Reply to
Derek

I'm not being critical of your merchant's honesty, but it's nearly impossible to judge how old the tea is just by the looks. It could possibly have been aged for 15 years, but that would make the price decently high. The merchant was probably told it was 15 years old, but how to verify?
There is also a process in which pu'er can be aged quicker by moistening it and then letting it dry out over and over again to try and make it appear older than it is. This usually damages the tea quality and can make it taste horrible. This is why I am so ardently against purchasing pu'er online; maybe that's a strong statement, perhaps extremely cautious.
The only way I will buy a tea is if I can try it first or am advised by someone that knows the particular tea well. I live in the middle of no where without any access to any teashops, so I have bought nothing new in a while. heh. Poor me.
Mydnight
-------------------- thus then i turn me from my countries light, to dwell in the solemn shades of an endless night.
Reply to
Mydnight
I think he meant cheap quality and not cheap price. I do support his assertion; the lower quality stuff for the most part tastes horrid.
Mydnight
-------------------- thus then i turn me from my countries light, to dwell in the solemn shades of an endless night.
Reply to
Mydnight

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