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Greetings
As promised, the rest of my Whisky Magazine collection is on e-bay. In case you are interested here is the link:
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Rufus
And, no Johanna this is not my exclusive source of info on Malt. By the way, did you know that when an entreprising individual invented a way to add grain whisky to malt (circa 1821 to make more money and distill faster and cheaper) it was decried by malt distillers all over scotland who did not want anything containing this stuff to be called whisky. Big business took care of that obviously.
Reply to
Rufus
Actually it was in 1827 that Robert Stein registered the patent on the first continuous still but it wasn't until 1830 that Aeneas Coffey, a former Irish exciseman, refined Stein's original design into the model that has been in use ever since, the Coffey still.
And actually it wasn't big business but a Royal Commission in 1909, that decided in favour of grain distillers on the big 'outcry', better known as the "What is Whisky?" case.
And please feel free to post if you need anymore clarification.
Johanna
Reply to
Johanna
Coffey still.
decided in favour
Most impressive!
--A Royal commission you say, could it be that the interest of the crown and the empire where on the side of mass production against the distillers and those of us who are on the side of taste? Why do you think the Royal commission approved this mislabeling of grain whisky mixed with malt as whisky? For money. Approving the "whisky" appelation for grain whisky was indeed a business decision (Royal commission notwithstanding) which made way for the transformation of single malt whisky into grain whisky. It had nothing to do with taste which makes all of your ranting and raving regarding JW Blue (rightly described by another poster as a means to get to the pocket book of wealthy asian buyers) all the more laughable. Grain whisky was made for mass production and to increase revenue, only a carboard connaisseur or a business person (an ad executive) could put that stuff on such a pedestal. Having the sources is important; (memorizing them is very impresive too --bravo Johanna!) but perhaps you might want to consider drawing conclusions from them too.
Regards,
Rufus
As for you charming offer of providing me with "clarifications", I'll tell you what: if I should need some more details, I'll go look at my sources, just like you did. Try not forget to quote them next time.
Reply to
Rufus
Well, I should say that --despite the sarcasm on both sides-- I've enjoyed this topic/argument because it deals (IMHO) with whether Scotch whisky should be viewed and made as an mass market product or considered as a unique product of a particular region (a terroir so to speak). "Perhaps a bit of both" is the usual cop out. But beyond that I'd like to see more control on what a brand should disclose regarding how it manufactures, and ages its single malt; more of an emphasis on vintages and single casks, etc, etc... The ideal would be to end up with a classification akin to that for the wines of the Bordelais region. Yeah, I know, its a pipe dream. But perhaps the education of the customer is where one should start; this is why it is so disconcerting to hear the best minds of this group reward an outrageously overpriced-created-for-asian-markets blend with incredible acollades. We are collectively far from a classification if most aficionados consider stuff with grain whisky in it to be worthy of exctatic comments --I know people in the industry or on the outskirts sing these praises to, but I think we can agree that they are beholden -- one way or another -- to the big corporate groups which own most distilleries. Anyways, perhaps people believe the future of the industry is tied to blends and therefore still feel obliged to support them, and that's a good point too.
Reply to
Rufus
Another real world option would be to accept the blenders art as a completely different and entirely legitimate malt (+ grain) classification. Because it is.
I like The JW Blue too. Had it once. Didn't pay for it. Still, it obviously had plenty of older malt in there, the nose was great and it was a smoooth pleasant dram along with a cigar. Memorable. Maybe the Japanese market has something to teach even the most jaded SSWC's out there.
Just returned from a Las Vegas Gathering. Over 300 malts available, provided by friends. Tried nearly 90 over four days; I could give you notes on every single one of them. We had some blends too, just to help celebrate all aspects of malt, including the addition of grain.
BTW- A single cask Yoichi "Peaty and Salty" Nikka 18/89 OB @ 62.3% done for Maison du Whisky was brilliant. Regards. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reply to
Mac Guffin

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