First Scotch recommendation


A young lady of my acquaintance has no experience with Scotch whisky. She lives too far away for me to let her taste my offerings. I'm thinking of suggesting The Glenlivet 12 yo as a starter. Thoughts?
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n_cramerSPAM

On 29 Jan 2006 10:04:36 GMT, n snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net replied:
Glenlivet can be a turn-off because it's so... tasteless. It's a good mixer and fills a need but not for getting someone interested in the diversity of sms.
I'd recommend something sherry-based; Cardhu, Balvenie (pick a style), Trader Joe's house brand...
By getting her to train herself, she can move to stronger, more smoky or peaty, sms.
The Ranger
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The Ranger

"The Ranger" skrev i melding news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
Depends... If she has got taste buds she would probably better appreciate the finer nuances of the more cultivated Speysides. It's the same with food, some people will pour ketchup, chilly sauce or worcester on anything before they eat..., others are more fine-tuned. :-) Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

No experience with Scotch at all? In that case she might want to spend less and get a decent blend. Alternatively, my wife cannot stand whisky but found she could cope with a single grain, is that an option? If it has to be a malt I'd suggest Dalwhinnie, a beautiful easy-going malt.
She could, of course, go for miniatures and try a range without it being prohibitively expensive.
Reply to
the man with no idea

Ouch! I know these things are a matter of personal taste but I would never describe Glenlivet as a mixer and would never use it as such. But, as they say, each to his/her own.
It might be an idea if the OP were to tell us what drinks he knows that the young lady is particularly fond of.
Reply to
the man with no idea

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Minis are an excellent method of trying a lot on the cheap to discover if you like 'em and if so, which.... this is how I got started. Excellent suggestion!
Gary
Reply to
g_h_obrien
Good question. I'll ask her and get back to the group.
Thanks guys.
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Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
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n_cramerSPAM

If it's not too late yet, get an idea of what her tastes in food are. If she has an adventurous palate -- likes spicy foods, is willing to try new ethnic dishes, etc. -- you could try something like Lagavulin or Talisker on her.
If she shies away from strange foods and exotic tastes, try something safer, like a Highland or a Speyside.
Highland Park might actually be a nice test. If she remarks on how smooth and heathery it is, stay with the highlands. If she notices and likes the mild smoke and peat, something more assertive might be next.
bill
Reply to
bill van
To which the young lady responded:
"I like beer, but not crappy American beer. When it comes to mixed drinks, I like cuba libres and southern comfort and sour mix. I like margaritas and daiquiris, too, but those almost don't count as alcohol."
Based on that, I may have to offer her a Hot Toddy!
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Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
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n_cramerSPAM

The beer remark is telling. She has some taste. I'd start her with a Highland Park 12. It's a crossroads between several major malt styles, and a class act.
Remind her to drink it neat or with a tiny bit of spring water if necessary. Listen closely to what she says about it to determine your next recommendation.
bill
Reply to
bill van
IMO Glenlivet is the ideal starter Scotch (it's proven to be so with me and many of my friends). If she likes it you can go from there. I sincerely doubt someone who's unfamiliar with whisky will find it bland.
Contrary to the accepted wisdom, I'd have her try it neat first, but let her add water (or even ice) at will if desired.
townes
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townes

Did she mean that she dislikes "those American beers which are crappy", or that she dislikes "all American beer, which is crappy"?
-- Larry
Reply to
pltrgyst
I would guess the former. She's prolly unaware of how many crappy furrin beers there are.
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n_cramerSPAM

In article , n snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net says...
The Glenlivet 12 is a good starter malt, much better in my opinion than the Glenfiddich, which was the first single for many, almost a whole generation of Americans. It isn't the deepest or most complex whisky, but it's sweet, has a good flavor and is also priced right. Someone who isn't sure they will like single malts may be reluctant to purchase something much more expensive. And G12 can be found in half bottles, 200ml bottles, and perhaps miniatures where more exotic whiskies may be unavailable. I doubt anyone who truly can't stand the taste of Glenlivet will love the Ardbeg 10 on first taste...
(But something similar once happened with a friend of mine, who didn't - and still doesn't - like scotch but liked a Caol Ila I had open at the time, much to my surprize.)
I've had good luck introducing the reluctant neophyte to single malts with the Dalwhinnie 15, pointing out it's "smoothness" compared to what most non-whisky drinkers associate with whisky, and the light floral qualities in the finish. And it's also a relatively sweet whisky without strong peat flavors. Lovers of scotch whisky forget how powerful those peat flavors were when they were not used to them.
Bart

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Bart

skrev i melding
I've heard that there are good American beers from small breweries, even very good ones if you know your beers, but when the talk is about the big brands, Budweiser et al., my understanding is that they hardly taste of beer at all... Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

"Bart" skrev i melding news:v snipped-for-privacy@texas.net...
Glenkinchie fits the same bill, a very nice and subtle dram. Glenfiddich is much maligned by peatomaniacs, but is not a bad drink either. Ok, you get tired from it after a while, but it is well made and flavourful for a beginner. Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

Hi sorry for butting in on ongoing thread ,, but I do read and try to learn I live and work on the Scottish islands,, Uist ( Outer Hebrides) and am deeply interested in the likes and dislikes of people,, I run a shop and also love whisky falling this tread I was wondering what I should stock recommended to my American visitors who come in for the odd bottle during the year.. I am slob Glenmorrangie all the way .. but as people have said different tastes ect,,, any suggestions apart from pee and iodine :)) old film
Lee www.clachan-stores.co.uk
any students or anyone else fancy a summer job in a island shop ?
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Bootneck

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