Aerating red wine


There is a $60 aerator...but what is the problem with simply stirring
the wine vigorously? There must be a problem with that if aerators go
for $60.
Reply to
AndyHancock
Any large jug will do. A magnum bottle is also ok. Or simply get an extra regular bottle and split the wine between the two, it will aerate.
A $60 decanter will generally look better, so if you want something that looks good, spend the money.
Stirring vigorously is not always a good idea. You may do that with certain low sulfite wines that may develop some CO2, stirring gets rid of it. Or with wines that really need a jolt of oxygen. Some wines, older ones, may need a lighter aeration plus you may want to decant the deposits, so stirring is not recommended.
Reply to
Mike Tommasi
My friends from France go crazy when you aerate or decant wine or even the mere suggestion of it. They always say, open the bottle and let it breath but the wine should not be moved until it is moved from the bottle into your glass to drink it.
Reply to
rozili
For many wines this is OK, but some require extra care... If a wine has a lot of sediment you have to decant it, if it is going through a closed phase it needs to be aerated. Some wines don't express much of their flavours unless you aerate them.
By opening the bottle and letting it "breathe" you are exposing a very small surface area, it may not breathe at all.
Reply to
Mike Tommasi
I fear that many French people don't understand the purpose or advantages of decanting. I'm a firm advocate of it although many of my French friends are quite shocked to see me do it. Until they taste the results. Then they go and do the same. You might like to suggest to your friends that they come and stay with me here, so they can become better educated about decanting wine!
Opening a bottle with no further action will do virtually nothing towards aerating the wine. How much is actually in contact with the air? Maybe 1/2 sq cm or so. (pi*r^2) If a wine is in need of air, then decanting (which the french differentiate from "carafing" for some bizarre reason) is the way to go. If it isn't then there's no point in removing the cork early.
The only time I ever saw anyone shaking wine was the Count Xavier St Exupéry at Ch Tiregand in Pécharmant. He did it for a very particular reason, which was to project the wine 5 years into its future for about 10 minutes - at the end of which it was nearly dead. I've used the technique myself on some very young wines where the flavours were all knotted up, in an attempt to see/taste where they were going.
-- All the best Fatty from Forges
Reply to
IanH
Does anyone have any experience with the Vinturi product? It is advertised in the Wine Spectator, and in theory it sounds good, but hen again a lot of things sound good in theory.
R
Reply to
R
In theory there is no difference between theory and paractice... but in practice, there is.
M
Reply to
Mikep
I've never tasted (red) wine that tasted carbonated, but then again, I don't have too much experience.
I was thinking of stirring the wine after it was poured into a glass, unless it is the lass glass of wine in a bottle, sediments won't be too bad (though I haven't really tried wines with sediment).
Reply to
AndyHancock
I was given a Vinturi as a gift and have blind tested it a number of times with fairly consistant results......it actually seems to work on young wines. I haven't used it on older wines.
Reply to
rvwrlee
I could not agree more Ian. Here in Ontario where our VQA wines tend to be consumed young they usually need a less than gentle decanting to get them in shape to be really enjoyed. Sediment, other than harmless "Wine Diamonds" don't really come into our decanting needs. Air contact, sometimes vigorous, is what wakes these youngsters up! Regards, Chuck
Reply to
Chuck Reid
If you pour the wine that requires the aeration into a glass first, wouldn't the sediments remain in the bottle?
Reply to
AndyHancock
Hmm, I didn't really have in mind to shake it, but to stir it with limited vigor in the glass, exposed to the air.
Does your post imply that shaking wine to artificially age it would automatically cause it to go badly shortly afterward? Would you know why that would happen even after the shaking stops?
Would the same effect occur under stirring?
Reply to
AndyHancock
That looks like what I picked up for a housewarming gift. It's quite the discussion garnerer. I never compared wine with and without the aerator. However, I'm not a connoisseur, so I'm not sure if I would have noticed a difference.
Reply to
AndyHancock
In article ,
Stirring and shaking wines are not necessarily good for them. It really doesn't increase aeration. Simply keeping a wine out in a glass for an hour will give you a better idea how the wine will taste down the road but nothing beats experience with wines and familiarity with brands and vintages.
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman
I understand what you are saying, but I'm just trying to understand it. Why does stirring not help when it exposes more of the wine to air?
Also, I didn't realize that 1 hour of aeration in a glass is typical...it's a long time to sit and look at the wine in anticipation. I'm liable to walk off and have it slip my mind.
Reply to
AndyHancock
In article ,
It really doesn't increase that much more wine to air simply by physical principle. To increase airing one would want to increase the amount of area there would be for air exchange. Probably spreading it out in a large shallow dish would work the best but I would think it would then be very difficult to drink.
Reply to
Lawrence Leichtman
Bi!! card to enlighten us with:
The don't even need a dish to enjoy wine.
Of all the dogs in my life (and there'vewen wuite a few), only Winston, my first bulldog, loved wine. He didn't drink often, but drink he did, or rather, he would lick up every single drop under the table whenever someone had overturned a glass at the "Heurigen" winery... And if it was funny (well, sort of) to walk home with a slightly drunken bulldog, it was a lot funnier to behold a bulldog with a terrible hangover the day after!
Winston has long gone to wherever bulldogs go when their time's up, and all the following dogs, bulldog or not, didn't care for wine, but rather for beer. My recent Rottweiler, however, seems to be a teetotaller...
Helmut, who just poured himself a nice glass of "Messwein" (Spaetrot a.k.a. Zierfandler) from Freigut Thallern, Gumpoldskirchen
Reply to
Helmut P. Einfalt

Site Timeline Threads

  • Betsy made roast chicken, cumin carrot puree, squash, and caprese. Wine for our...
  • last posted in

    General Wine

  • Betsy made roast chicken, cumin carrot puree, squash, and caprese. Wine for our...
  • site's newest in

    General Wine

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.