Is it too early to discuss (USA) Thanksgiving wines?


Hi all, We've hosted a family Thanksgiving dinner for quite a few years. Wines served are usually Zinfandel, Pinot Noir and Riesling. This is a traditional (USA) turkey, stuffing, etc. dinner. Would a Vouvray be a good addition to the wine list?
Thanks for any opinions, Dick R.
Reply to
Dick R.
> Hi all, > We've hosted a family Thanksgiving dinner for quite > a few years. Wines served are usually Zinfandel, Pinot Noir > and Riesling. This is a traditional (USA) turkey, stuffing, > etc. dinner. Would a Vouvray be a good addition to the wine list? > > Thanks for any opinions, > Dick R.
Don't forget Chianti Normale.
Reply to
UC
"Dick R." skrev i meddelandet news:12hr5eporf66728@corp.supernews.com... > Hi all, > We've hosted a family Thanksgiving dinner for quite > a few years. Wines served are usually Zinfandel, Pinot Noir > and Riesling. This is a traditional (USA) turkey, stuffing, > etc. dinner. Would a Vouvray be a good addition to the wine list?
Dick, I will accept that my opinions are slightly skewed, as we do not observe Thanksgiving in Sweden (notwithstanding that we have lots and lots to be thankful for). This said, with what would you consider drinking a Vouvray? It goes well with salmon, duck liver,adn, I'd guess, some cheese, like Munster or Epoisse. What is your take on it?
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
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Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren

Michael, after all your pontificating about reading posts and responding appropriately to what is requested by the OP - would you mind telling me what in the blue blazes of hell does Chianti Normale have to do with Vouvray?
Reply to
st.helier
> Michael, after all your pontificating about reading posts and responding > appropriately to what is requested by the OP - would you mind telling me > what in the blue blazes of hell does Chianti Normale have to do with > Vouvray?
He has been drinking Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, and Riesling. I suggested considering something else. It was within the scope of the question.
Reply to
UC
"Michael Scarpitti" wrote ..... > > It was within the scope of the question.>
Hogwash!!!
The question posed was very specific "Would a Vouvray be a good addition to the wine list?"
My point is this - you have constantly garbled on about answering the questions posed by OPs - while you yourself ignore very specific requests, to spout your own preferences (in this case, while you make a worthy suggestion, it is not requested and unwanted in the context of the question posed!)
You cannot have it both ways - for goodness sake, introduce some consistency into your writings - you are just like a blind javelin hrower - you keep everyone guessing.
While I have only limited agreement with your stance on wine with / without food (very much confirmed in my recent survey!): I pity your pathetic inability to even write the word France: and I laugh at your suggestion that Europeans have some instinctive, inherited knowledge about all wines and that one should not taste and learn and form an opinion based on ones own sensory evaluation - I do defend your right to express yourself.
Now tonight, I am serving *fresh* (it is still alive as I write) New Zealand rock lobster (halved - a few minutes under a grill) with a green salad (organic - picked overnight purchased this morning from the local farmers' market).
Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc?
(Don't answer Michael! I am posing this question of myself - since you know nothing of the wines of the world (excluding Italy) - you are not qualified to comment!!!)
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st.helier
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st.helier
Reply to
st.helier
> "Michael Scarpitti" wrote ..... > > > > It was within the scope of the question.> > > Hogwash!!! > > The question posed was very specific "Would a Vouvray be a good addition to > the wine list?" I suppose so, but I thought it would nice to suggest a Chianti Normale. > My point is this - you have constantly garbled on about answering the > questions posed by OPs - while you yourself ignore very specific requests, > to spout your own preferences (in this case, while you make a worthy > suggestion, it is not requested and unwanted in the context of the question > posed!) > > You cannot have it both ways - for goodness sake, introduce some > consistency into your writings - you are just like a blind javelin > hrower - you keep everyone guessing. OK, I apologize for suggesting something that was not specifically asked. > While I have only limited agreement with your stance on wine with / without > food (very much confirmed in my recent survey!): I pity your pathetic > inability to even write the word France: and I laugh at your suggestion that > Europeans have some instinctive, inherited knowledge about all wines and > that one should not taste and learn and form an opinion based on ones own > sensory evaluation - I do defend your right to express yourself. The wine-producing countries of Europe have a wine culture that is lacking in the US. > Now tonight, I am serving *fresh* (it is still alive as I write) New Zealand > rock lobster (halved - a few minutes under a grill) with a green salad > (organic - picked overnight purchased this morning from the local farmers' > market). > > Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc? > > (Don't answer Michael! I am posing this question of myself - since you know > nothing of the wines of the world (excluding Italy) - you are not qualified > to comment!!!) Correct. I know nothing about those wines. I bet, though, that a Valentini Trebbiano d'Abruzzi would complement your crustacean fabulously. > > -- > > st.helier
Reply to
UC

I think sec-tendre Vouvray (most Vouvray without a designation by the way will be probably sec-tendre- just off-dry -it's between those labeled sec and those labeled demi-sec) is a very fine all-purpose food-friendly wine. Just the ticket for the matching nightmare that is American Thanksgiving! I think for once we're not travelling to family, may put one on my table, thanks for idea!
And, because it's driving me crazy, may I just say as far as it goes to my knowledge there is no such animal as Chianti Normale? One sometimes uses normale (note the lowercase!) as a descriptor to Barolo or Brunello (to distinguish between the Riserva and the single vineyard wines and the non-riserva blends), but the capitalization makes it look like some kind of official designation.
Good luck on your dinner. I hope we can both post on excellent Vouvrays!
Reply to
DaleW
> > Now tonight, I am serving *fresh* (it is still alive as I write) New > Zealand rock lobster (halved - a few minutes under a grill) with a > green salad (organic - picked overnight purchased this morning from > the local farmers' market). > > Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc? >
Speaking of which I had the pleasure this afternoon of meeting Kim Crawford, chatting a brief while (no wines were sampled) and purchasing some 2006 SB and 2005 Pinot Noir. Delightful gentleman albeit quite tall. I would think the chard.
pavane
Reply to
pavane
> Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc?
While this question may be rhetoric, I'd suggest the SB. Maybe even from Martinborough. Had the Palliser Estate SB from there some time ago [05 vintage] and it was gorgeous with a not-too-spicy chicken biryani.
Reply to
Salil
> >>Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc? > > > While this question may be rhetoric, I'd suggest the SB. Maybe even > from Martinborough. Had the Palliser Estate SB from there some time ago > [05 vintage] and it was gorgeous with a not-too-spicy chicken biryani. >
Ah, the Palliser Estate SB. It's a favorite of both St. H. and myself, but I haven't yet had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of the '05. The '02 was a marvelous wine, both under cork and Stelvin (both available here in the US), but the '04 was a bit of a letdown. Thanks for the heads-up on the '05. (I can't say that I've tried it with any biryani, but I had a goat biryani for lunch today that probably would have done well with it)
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton
"st.helier" skrev i meddelandet news:efke6a$mdd$1@news.datemas.de... > Now tonight, I am serving *fresh* (it is still alive as I write) New > Zealand rock lobster (halved - a few minutes under a grill) with a green > salad (organic - picked overnight purchased this morning from the local > farmers' market). > > Do I serve an unoaked NZ chardonnay or a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc? >
Hello St Helier, I would, after pondering this question and relating it to previous experinces, both down under and - what would be the opposite? up over? sounds freaky - well, anyway - I do believe an unoaked Chardonnay, of teh kind you are suggesting, would be a good foil for the realtively delicate shellfish. My very personal opinion (never humble) is that the NZ SauvBlanc, excellent as they are, are a bit overpowering in the context. And no mistake, mate.
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
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Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
"DaleW" skrev i meddelandet news:1159577413.849206.251530@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com... > And, because it's driving me crazy, may I just say as far as it goes to > my knowledge there is no such animal as Chianti Normale? One sometimes > uses normale (note the lowercase!) as a descriptor to Barolo or > Brunello (to distinguish between the Riserva and the single vineyard > wines and the non-riserva blends), but the capitalization makes it look > like some kind of official designation.
Ciao Dale, Il Signor Google e il mio amico. I found in the Italian wikipedia the term Chianti normale - just as you say, here, it is used to differentiate the base, or entry level, version from those of specific sub-regions, or, in cotnradistinction to the riserva, so, in fact, not a "term", rather, Iif I were to translate it into broken Enlgish, I would say "the normal Chianti", or, the "base Chianti". Looking into several articles, I find the use not quiteconsistent, in that some use the expression Chianti Classico normale (not lower-case "n"). In some cases, the "n" is upper-cse, but they are never Italian (or, at least, I haven't found any Italian articles using upper-case "n"). And normale with a lower-case "n".
If I have misinterpreted some of the Italian articles, I am certain that MikeT or Vilco will correct me ;)
Cheers
Nils Gsuatf -- Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se
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Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
> Il Signor Google e il mio amico. I found in the Italian > wikipedia the term Chianti normale - just as you say, here, it > is used to differentiate the base, or entry level, version from > those of specific sub-regions, or, in cotnradistinction to the > riserva, so, in fact, not a "term", rather, Iif I were to > translate it into broken Enlgish, I would say "the normal > Chianti", or, the "base Chianti". Looking into several articles, > I find the use not quiteconsistent, in that some use the > expression Chianti Classico normale (not lower-case "n"). In > some cases, the "n" is upper-cse, but they are never Italian > (or, at least, I haven't found any Italian articles using > upper-case "n"). And normale with a lower-case "n".
What normally is used in Italian wine circles, Michele T. should be an expert.
Thus said, I have heard the term "annata" - to differentiate from "riserva" - quite often.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay

Nils Gustaf, I have no objection to Chianti normale. It's the use of Chianti Normale that bothered me. It looks like a proper noun with the capitalization, and I think we should be as proper as possible in our use of wine names. A lurker might think that they would be able to find a bottle labeled Normale based on those posts. One might refer to a CA winery as having a regular or basic CS in addition to their Reserve or single vineyard bottlings, but no one would say their "Base Cabernet Sauvignon" or Cabernet Sauvignon Regular".
Reply to
DaleW
> Nils Gustaf, > I have no objection to Chianti normale. It's the use of Chianti Normale > that bothered me. It looks like a proper noun with the capitalization, > and I think we should be as proper as possible in our use of wine > names. A lurker might think that they would be able to find a bottle > labeled Normale based on those posts. One might refer to a CA winery as > having a regular or basic CS in addition to their Reserve or single > vineyard bottlings, but no one would say their "Base Cabernet > Sauvignon" or Cabernet Sauvignon Regular". >
no such thing as "Chianti Normale". The adjective is used lower case to stress that it is not Classico.
-- Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France email link
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Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France
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Reply to
Mike Tommasi
"DaleW" skrev i meddelandet news:1159616852.253277.249250@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com... > Nils Gustaf, > I have no objection to Chianti normale. It's the use of Chianti Normale > that bothered me. It looks like a proper noun with the capitalization, > and I think we should be as proper as possible in our use of wine > names. A lurker might think that they would be able to find a bottle > labeled Normale based on those posts. One might refer to a CA winery as > having a regular or basic CS in addition to their Reserve or single > vineyard bottlings, but no one would say their "Base Cabernet > Sauvignon" or Cabernet Sauvignon Regular".
Dale, I think, and the estimated Mike T:s post bears me out, that we are, in fact, in total agreement. The "normale" simply means "the ordinary stuff" and is not, in fact, an operationally defined term in the denominazione systems extant. So the the other Michael uses an ordinary expression as if it were a oenological term. I am, obviously, very much in agreement with you concerning the need for using the proper expressions.
Wishing you a pleasant weekend
Chees
Nils Gsutaf
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Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
> no such thing as "Chianti Normale". The adjective is used lower case to > stress that it is not Classico. >
In which case, it would be more of a geographical term than one related to vinification practice. So, could there be a Chianti Riserva normale (or would that be Chianti normale Riserva)?
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton
> > > no such thing as "Chianti Normale". The adjective is used lower case to > > stress that it is not Classico. > > > > In which case, it would be more of a geographical term than one related > to vinification practice. So, could there be a Chianti Riserva normale > (or would that be Chianti normale Riserva)? > > Mark Lipton
Just plain "Chianti Classico" is often called 'normale' in the books. My error was in usig a capital 'N'.
Reply to
UC
> "Dick R." skrev i meddelandet > news:12hr5eporf66728@corp.supernews.com... > >>Hi all, >>We've hosted a family Thanksgiving dinner for quite >>a few years. Wines served are usually Zinfandel, Pinot Noir >>and Riesling. This is a traditional (USA) turkey, stuffing, >>etc. dinner. Would a Vouvray be a good addition to the wine list? > > Dick, > I will accept that my opinions are slightly skewed, as we do not observe > Thanksgiving in Sweden (notwithstanding that we have lots and lots to be > thankful for). This said, with what would you consider drinking a Vouvray? > It goes well with salmon, duck liver,adn, I'd guess, some cheese, like > Munster or Epoisse. What is your take on it? > > Cheers > > Nils Gustaf Hej Nils, Thanks for your thoughts and suggestions on Vouvray and food. The typical American Thanksgiving dinner in my opinion is a food/wine pairing nightmare. Roast turkey, bread stuffing, beef gravy with giblets, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes with marshmallows, cranberries, and a very small bowl of rutabagas I like to serve a selection of wines to suit everyone's palate, and after reading the Vouvray thread, I thought I'd try a bottle. Might work, might not.
As they say in Sverige, Skol! Dick R.
Reply to
Dick R.

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