M-Proney...aimed at you: Champagne servied in Bordeaux Glasss vs Flute

Was at a Duval-Leroy tasting yesterday and their was a man there from the
winery that handed out a brochure piece with some history, tasting notes and
some tips.
They prefer to drink their Champagne in a Bordeau glass similar to Reidel
Bordeaux.
Have you or anyone here heard of that as a way to drink Champagne?
Reply to
Richard Neidich
Wonder what fill level one would pour into such a glass, and certainly the focusing of the bubbles and nose would not be important (and why not)?
Reply to
Kirk-O-Scottland
"Richard Neidich" skrev i meddelandet news:4UK5d.3692$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
Funny you should ask ... we celebrated our 23rd wedding aniversary Saturday, and started witha bottle of champagne (Fleury Brut, no vintage, biodynamic producer, nose of ripe appels, hints of cream fudge, acceptable entry level fizz at c. EU 14), and I had indeed poured it into our trusty 'Svalka' slightly tulip shaped wine glasses. Xina commented on this, so we pulled out a couple of flutes and reached the immediate verdict that the tulips were better than the flutes - better concentration of nose, better appreciation of taste.
HTH
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
Of course, that's what I am doing for ages.
For everyday winers (which might occasionally include champagne) I use the IKEA Svalka red wine glass:
In fact, I never really have understood the reason for flutes. After all, champagne is a wine (and the best champagne is world class by any standards) that deserves a glass where its bouquet can develop decently - which is definitely not the case with flutes.
In fact I do not even have flutes anymore.
M.
P.S.: Flutes are really good for spirits.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
Salut/Hi Richard
-
I'll jump in here. About 2 years ago, Jacquie and I were in Turin at the (EXCELLENT) Salon del Gusto organised by Slow food. Michael Tommasi had organised some activities there from France, and one was a dinner designed to match 10 champagnes from (occasional afw contributor) Francis Boulard. Without wanting to be too contentious, I found some of the matches tenuous, and that not all the dishes to be 100% successful, but a) that's not the purpose of writing and b) one can learn as much from the less successful as the wholly successful.
Anyway, Francis caused something of a stir amongst the staff, who after having scoured the city for enough champagne flutes to serve 10 different champagnes to some 150 or so participants, found that Francis didn't WANT his champagnes served in flutes!!!!! As he put it succintly, "I want my wine to be judged above all as wine, the bubbles are an added extra. If all you want is bubbles, then drink Coke." OK, it was put somewhat trenchantly, but there's a good point there. If a champagne can't hold its own _as wine_ then it's nbg. My problem for years with the stuff was that I'd never tasted really good champagne, and I was having the temerity to judge it _as wine_, and finding that it wasn't good wine.
So yes, some champagne growers do prefer to taste their champagne in good wine glasses, for the same reason as one drinks wine in that shape. It allows the smells and flavours to be appreciated to the full. If the mousse suffers very slightly, then so be it.
Reply to
Ian Hoare
Salut/Hi Kirk-O-Scottland,
-
Same as for any other wine poured into a wine glass. You wouldn't try to put a litre of wine into a Riedel Sommelier Bordeaux glass, would you, so why should one fill a smaller glass, just because it's champagne.
Reply to
Ian Hoare
I have been doing same for over a year now. Flutes are good for those occasions when someone brings you a mediocre champagne and you are made to understand that it MUST be opened... ;-)
Mike
Mike Tommasi, Six Fours, France email link
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Reply to
Mike Tommasi
I was absolutly surprised to hear serve in Bordeaux glass with big bulb.
I will try next time.
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Reply to
Richard Neidich
Salut/Hi Michael Pronay,
-
Grin. But then, they only drink good stuff.
They should drink the stuff sold at around €8 in the supermarkets here. That would show them. No, I'm wrong, that's not _mediocre_ it's just plain awful muck.
Reply to
Ian Hoare
It would make it much easier when I serve a Champagne with first course and switch to red after that. Only one glass per person to wash. Flutes are a pain to wash too....
I will try this. Less mess.
Reply to
Richard Neidich
Yes, to be specific Francis said : "serve it as if you were serving a Meursault" ...
Funny, like Ian I also went through a long period of not really getting along with Champagne. Perhaps because it is so often thought of as a branded product, it took me a long time to discover that there are hundreds of vintners making wine in Champagne. It just happens to have bubbles.
Also remarkable is the fact that older vintage Champs are superbly evolved, and letting their bubbles calm down while decanting multiplies the effect of these aromas by 10. Extraordinary when you get both the honeyed aromas of mature chard, plus a very fine oxidation that makes it delicious as an aperitif.
Mike
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Mike Tommasi, Six Fours, France email link
formatting link
Reply to
Mike Tommasi
First the return address of snipped-for-privacy@tommasi.org is funny.
That really does sound like good advice. I had 3 old bottles of Dom that were RECENT DISGORGED...I really wish I had done this then. They were truly outstanding and I bet I did not even get the fully experience.
I need to spend a week with you, Ian and M. Proney to destroy my liver more.
Somehow I see you guys having problems with the Champagne. Just the slow food that you belong to would seem more anti-corporated atmosphere and for good reason. No doubt the highly commercialized food industry that controls huge lobbys is not only destroying some farmland but making it to the point that food is becoming less flavored. I have a company that markets dry beans. Dry Beans are really good for the soil. However with Dry Beans on the decline due to less cooking here and abroad less farmland is being used e)ach year for Dry Bean plantings.(Dry Beans = Pinto's, Great Northerns, Blackeyes, Lentils and yes--French Green Lentils, Green Split Peas, Limas, Kidneys.....
Again I wish I had some of the old 3 bottle case I had of RD Dom. But I do havea a couple bottles of Bollinger RD....I have never tried the Bollinger RD's. They were a gift to me. I have had there basic and thought it was just OK.
Recently there is one getting lots of hype here..it is Jacquesson 728 Brut. I tried it last week and thought it was very good but overpriced in its class.
I will have to try all these again in a different glass and see if my thoughts change.
Reply to
Richard Neidich
"Michael Pronay" skrev i meddelandet news: snipped-for-privacy@pronay.com...
No, not Rotwein-Glas - sondern Weinprobe-Glas ;)
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
"Richard Neidich" skrev i meddelandet news:MUT5d.1561$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
In fact, we continued the said supper with game, accomapnied by Dom. Launay Pommard 'Les perriérès' (sorry if the diacriticals are not in place) 1997, a huge majestic still youthful hunk of a Bourgogne - but we changed to our Enomous Balloons (that holds 78 cl). What a wonderful wine. Best is we still have four bottles of it in the cellar, so we´ll open one each year, while the ones we bought this summer comes of age ...
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
In my many, many trips to Champagne I find this to be the case about 50% of the time. Often at small Champagne houses they serve in a regular wine glass as opposed to a flute and bistro's, cafes' etc will often serve in regular wine glasses. Flutes seem to be used in the larger, more tourist oriented Champagne houses and upscale restaurants. Bi!!
Reply to
RV WRLee
OK, for those who want to know the difference:

I guess both suit the demands of an everyday drinking glass quite well.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
Salut/Hi Richard Neidich,
-
For me it wasn't so much the "small is beautiful, big is bad", it was that most of the Champagne I'd drunk gave me raging heartburn. I felt that a wine which gave itself so many airs and graces shouldn't DO that. I judged the stuff in my glass against say, Meursault or a good German wine, and compared value for money, pure and simple.
I can't resist sending you the recipe for one of our favourite soups. We make it very often and are in fact serving it tonight. We eat loads of beans. When I'm in the States, I shall be stocking up with several varieties we can't get in Europe, Red Limas, small Limas, Great Northern, at the least. Probably some of the pink ones too.
@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
Cajun 15 Bean Soup
cajun, main dish, soups, starters, vegetables
285 gm mixed beans 1500 ml water or ham/bacon stock 500 gm poitrine fumé; diced 1 medium onion; chopped 1 clove garlic; crushed 50 gm fat 1 teaspoon chili powder 500 gm tomatoes; concassée 1 lemon juice
Soak beans overnight, then drain and cook 2 1/2 to 3 hours with water or stock. While beans are cooking, prepare flavourings. Heat fat, which can be lard, goose fat etc., and cook the salt pork dice till fat runs. Add onion and garlic and fry till meat is browned. Stir in chili powder and turn off heat forthwith.
When beans are soft but not cooked to a mush, add meat mixture to pot, together with tomatoes and lemon juice to taste. Simmer 1/2 hour. Correct seasoning.
Mmed IMH c/o Gohlam BBS Fido 2:320/116.14
Yield: 8 servings
** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.66 **
Reply to
Ian Hoare

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