Re: TN: Bordeaux (& Burgs, Austrian SB, etc) at Triomphe


2003 Erwin Sabathi Pössnitzberg Sauvignon Blanc
> Mineral and white flowers, good gooseberry fruit B+
>
> 2003 Erwin Sabathi Poharnig Sauvignon Blanc
> Smokey, with a flinty note. Fruit seems a tad riper here. B/B+
>
> I'd like to taste these from a less ripe vintage- I think a little
> extra acidic zing might make for a great SB.
No problem, 2004 is coming ...
But you are right, of course: 2003 was a totally exceptional year.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
Michael, Can you tell me what '04 in Austria is looking like? Any regions really stick out? I've liked a variety of '03s, but in almost every case if I had the same wine in '02, I preferred the 2002.
Reply to
DaleW

Very good in Burgenland, rather late in other regions except Thermenregion.
Wait until you get the better 2003s in red - the best ever!
2004: The top names once again did an exceptional job. Generaly spoken, it's rather classic with good aciditiy levels, very fresh, the fruit having a texture you can almost feel on the palate, nearly like a mousseux. I have to confess to like them a lot. The whites have a distinct vintage note: A fruit that reminds of stone-fruit, but also fresh white pears. Many Veltliners hav a hint of riesling in that vintage.
HTH a little,
Michael
Reply to
Michael Pronay
We should have our first container arrive with some of the 2004 vintage in just a couple of months, and I am REALLY excited about these wines! I'll let you all know first when I have them available.
e.
Reply to
winemonger
Not in this container. Some of our Steinfeders and Classics have the synthetic cork, but none of our wineries are doing screw caps yet. It's something we'll explore with the bigger producers in the future, though (maybe Sabathi, for their Sabathini?)
We ordered a bottle of the Hirsch GV at dinner not long ago, to see how our dining companions reacted to the screw cap. These were not exactly "novice" wine drinkers, but not too seasoned either. They were, of course, very surprised (and very skeptical, which they tried not to show) This screw-cap revolution is going to be a long education process!
e.
Reply to
winemonger

I'm not sure. Things are changing quite fast here in Austria, despite Falstaff Magazine's fierce writing against screw tops (and glass stoppers). Otoh, both Vinaria and A la Carte are very much pro screw-caps (no wonder, I write for both ;-).
Now even news magazines have jumped onto the train:

Bottom right: Click on "Top-Winzer läuten Ende der Korkära ein"
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
It's certainly the hot topic, and I think that everyone who either posts on wine-related boards or reads wine publications (even just occasionally) has either made up their mind about it, or are at least aware that screw cap does not equal cheap bad wine. What I'm talking about is the huge bulk of wine consumers who don't know a huge amount about wine, but know enough to tell when a wine is good or foul, and are willing to spend a little more money per bottle for the drinkable stuff. I don't think they necessarily know that some good wines come under a screw cap, and they may not have the confidence to serve up a screw capped bottle to friends. This is where I think the education process will take some time. But as more of these stories hit the mainstream press, things will move along.
The vintners of Austria are special. They seem among the most willing to combine the latest technologies with centuries of tradition, so long as it serves to create great wines.
e.
Reply to
winemonger
Emily, I'd love to see your notes on your '04 wines after they arrive and settle.
I realize it is tough for producers to be in the vanguard of screwcaps. With a few exceptions who rhapsodize over the "romance" of cork (do they want my bottles that smell of wet cardboard-now those are romantic!), most geeks are pretrty onboard as to preferring screwcaps (at least on wines intended for consumption w/in 5 years of bottling). But the much of the general public associates screwcap with cheap. But as more bottlers take the leap, and some press, hopefully that will change.
I was describing wines from Saturday to a semi-geek at a party yesterday. He liked Austrian GVs, but had never had an Austrian SB. When he asked me what they were like, I struggled a bit. What I eventually came up with was that your Sabathi SBs reminded me a bit of focused pure Loires. The Pössnitzberg more like a Sancerre, while the Poharnig was more like a Pouilly-Fumé. That's not really fair to your wines, they deserve to be viewed in their own right not compared to Loires, but it was best analogy I could come up with for this guy's frame of reference.
Reply to
DaleW
HTH indeed.
You meant Hope That Helps. And indeed it did, a good concise informative answer.
But I could regard it as Hope That Hurts, as I contemplate damage to my checkbook of a good Austrian vintage. :)
Reply to
DaleW

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