TN: A very good CA Merlot,and an ok Moscato


Last night Betsy was getting back from city late, so I said I'd cook. Actually there were plenty of leftovers in fridge for sides, so I merely dealt with main course. A couple of (dry-aged, but choice) ribeyes rubbed with coffee, cumin, and paprika, then grilled. Called for a hearty wine, after lots of Bordeaux night before went California. The 1999 Albini Family Merlot (Russian River Valley) was actually REALLY nice, the best under-$30 California Merlot I've had in ages (ok admittedly not the area I concentrate on). Nose of crushed berries with a light chocolate overtone, rich red and black fruit on the palate. Some earth and mint emerge with time, but both take a back seat to the deep fruit. Bountiful but ripe tannins, just enough acidity to keep it from falling into Kaspar Gutman territory. Clearly New World, but playing to those strengths without overplaying. A-
Tonight Betsy made a salsa verde, slathered in on some halibut steaks, and I grilled (on aluminum foil). I had worried re the salsa and had opted for a lightly sweet lightly bubbling wine. Turns out the salsa was near as hot nor as acidic (I think roasting the peppers and tomatillas made a difference) as the salsa verde I make. A crisp dry wine would have been fine. But the 2003 Marcarini Moscato d'Asti wasn't bad, though a tad sweet without pepper heat to contend with. But decent wine -who put peaches in my apple cider? Fun, easy, and simple, but for $10 who wants more? I might pick up one or two more to match with really spicy food on a hot day. A whopping 5% ABV. B
Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency
Reply to
DaleW
> Last night Betsy was getting back from city late, so I said I'd cook. > Actually there were plenty of leftovers in fridge for sides, so I > merely dealt with main course. A couple of (dry-aged, but choice) > ribeyes rubbed with coffee, cumin, and paprika, then grilled.
Hi, Dale -
This is certainly a dumb question, but what form of coffee in the rub? Freshly ground? Obviously I've never done this.
Tom S
Reply to
Tom S
In article , Dwmidnt@aol.com says... > >Last night Betsy was getting back from city late, so I said I'd cook. >Actually there were plenty of leftovers in fridge for sides, so I >merely dealt with main course. A couple of (dry-aged, but choice) >ribeyes rubbed with coffee, cumin, and paprika, then grilled. Called >for a hearty wine, after lots of Bordeaux night before went California. >The 1999 Albini Family Merlot (Russian River Valley) was actually >REALLY nice, the best under-$30 California Merlot I've had in ages (ok >admittedly not the area I concentrate on). Nose of crushed berries with >a light chocolate overtone, rich red and black fruit on the palate. >Some earth and mint emerge with time, but both take a back seat to the >deep fruit. Bountiful but ripe tannins, just enough acidity to keep it >from falling into Kaspar Gutman territory. Clearly New World, but >playing to those strengths without overplaying. A- > >Tonight Betsy made a salsa verde, slathered in on some halibut steaks, >and I grilled (on aluminum foil). I had worried re the salsa and had >opted for a lightly sweet lightly bubbling wine. Turns out the salsa >was near as hot nor as acidic (I think roasting the peppers and >tomatillas made a difference) as the salsa verde I make. A crisp dry >wine would have been fine. But the 2003 Marcarini Moscato d'Asti wasn't >bad, though a tad sweet without pepper heat to contend with. But decent >wine -who put peaches in my apple cider? Fun, easy, and simple, but for >$10 who wants more? I might pick up one or two more to match with >really spicy food on a hot day. A whopping 5% ABV. B > > >Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent >wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't >drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no >promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency
Dale,
Thanks for the TNs. I'm not familiar with Albini Family, but will look it up. I seem to have pretty bad fortune with CA Merlots, Duckhorn and Phelps, being exceptions.
The steaks sound delish! I usually dust in a bit of cocoa powder, along with the coffee. I have also learned that my new coffee grinder doesn't do espresso grind fine enough - gotta' get the DeLongi fixed!!!! Now, I get Starbucks to do a really fine espresso grind on a French roast (often decaf for my wife).
I agree about the Moscato d'Asti, for US$10, one cannot go too far wrong for a sparkler.
Again, thanks, Hunt
Reply to
Hunt
> Hi, Dale - > > This is certainly a dumb question, but what form of coffee in the rub? > Freshly ground? Obviously I've never done this. >
Tom: It's pretty simple,just mix some spices into some freshly group coffee. I used a Columbian coffee, with ground cumin, sweet paprika, sea salt and black pepper. It's doesn't really taste like coffee, but the crust gives it a smokey edge. I think I fixed for Ian and Jacquie when they were in NY.
Reply to
DaleW
> Thanks for the TNs. I'm not familiar with Albini Family, but will look it up. > I seem to have pretty bad fortune with CA Merlots, Duckhorn and Phelps, being > exceptions. > > The steaks sound delish! I usually dust in a bit of cocoa powder, along with > the coffee. I have also learned that my new coffee grinder doesn't do espresso > grind fine enough - gotta' get the DeLongi fixed!!!! Now, I get Starbucks to > do a really fine espresso grind on a French roast (often decaf for my wife). > > I agree about the Moscato d'Asti, for US$10, one cannot go too far wrong for a > sparkler. > > Again, thanks, > Hunt
I've been to Albini WInery (it's just a small building on their propery. They only make 500 cases of wine a year so it can be a challenge to find. I was there with a friend who knows the family so they opened a couple of ultra-low release Zin(I think they said 50 cases) which was really terrific.
Reply to
Bi!!
Salut/Hi DaleW, le/on 29 Apr 2005 07:27:41 -0700, tu disais/you said:- >> This is certainly a dumb question, but what form of coffee in the >rub? >> Freshly ground? Obviously I've never done this. >> > >Tom: >It's pretty simple,just mix some spices into some freshly group coffee. >I used a Columbian coffee, with ground cumin, sweet paprika, sea salt >and black pepper. It's doesn't really taste like coffee, but the crust >gives it a smokey edge. I think I fixed for Ian and Jacquie when they >were in NY.
you did, and it was amazing! I'm afraid I've been more or less lurking these last few weeks, (converting my website to HTML 4.01 and CSS, not that you'll want to know) and so I didn't comment earlier.
The only tiny criticism I'd have was over the texture of the grounds still sticking to the meat. They are a touch gritty, don't you agree?
But the flavour... wow!
-- All the Best Ian Hoare
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Reply to
Ian Hoare
"Ian Hoare" skrev i melding news:fda771186c5c7fiq3h0ajrroh1gbsffv6b@4ax.com... > Salut/Hi DaleW, > > > you did, and it was amazing! I'm afraid I've been more or less lurking > these > last few weeks, (converting my website to HTML 4.01 and CSS, not that > you'll > want to know) and so I didn't comment earlier. > Hi Ian I had a peep at your 'new' website and found the following, on your terms: "French francs, pounds sterling or US dollars are all accepted" You would really accept my old FF?
:-) Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog
> Bountiful but ripe tannins, just enough acidity to keep it > from falling into Kaspar Gutman territory. Clearly New World, but > playing to those strengths without overplaying. A-
Sorry to be slow on the uptake, Dale, but what exactly does "The Maltese Falcon" have to do with this wine? Is that a backhand reference to "fat"??
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton

"The only tiny criticism I'd have was over the texture of the grounds still sticking to the meat. They are a touch gritty, don't you agree? "
I've been experimenting with that. I've tried using a very fine grind, which lessens the effect. But last couple times I've used a coarser grind, but "wiped" the meat with the back of a table knife. You'd think that would cost flavor, but the meat seems to have absorbed the flavor, and the texture is better.
Reply to
DaleW
Salut/Hi DaleW, le/on 1 May 2005 12:09:19 -0700, tu disais/you said:- >"The only tiny criticism I'd have was over the texture of the grounds >still >sticking to the meat. They are a touch gritty, don't you agree? " >I've been experimenting with that. I've tried using a very fine grind, >which lessens the effect. But last couple times I've used a coarser >grind, but "wiped" the meat with the back of a table knife. You'd think >that would cost flavor, but the meat seems to have absorbed the flavor, >and the texture is better.
I do a similar thing with my magrets au gros sel. I sprinkle the meat side VERY liberally with coarsely ground black pepper a couple of hours before cooking, and then just before covering them with the salt, I scrape it all off. Very successful technique. However, I'd have thought that with the coffee rubbed steak, the grounds act as protection to some extent, or don't you feel it's needed? Sort of like blackened fish.
-- All the Best Ian Hoare
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Reply to
Ian Hoare
Hi again Anders Tørneskog, le/on Sat, 30 Apr 2005 16:54:16 GMT, tu disais/you said:- >I had a peep at your 'new' website
You can try again, if you like. I spent a tiring day uploading the lot! whew. -- All the Best Ian Hoare
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Ian Hoare
In article , ianhoare@angelfire. com says... > >Salut/Hi DaleW, > > le/on 29 Apr 2005 07:27:41 -0700, tu disais/you said:- > >>> This is certainly a dumb question, but what form of coffee in the >>rub? >>> Freshly ground? Obviously I've never done this. >>> >> >>Tom: >>It's pretty simple,just mix some spices into some freshly group coffee. >>I used a Columbian coffee, with ground cumin, sweet paprika, sea salt >>and black pepper. It's doesn't really taste like coffee, but the crust >>gives it a smokey edge. I think I fixed for Ian and Jacquie when they >>were in NY. > >you did, and it was amazing! I'm afraid I've been more or less lurking these >last few weeks, (converting my website to HTML 4.01 and CSS, not that you'll >want to know) and so I didn't comment earlier. > >The only tiny criticism I'd have was over the texture of the grounds still >sticking to the meat. They are a touch gritty, don't you agree? > >But the flavour... wow! > >-- >All the Best >Ian Hoare >
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That has been my experience, since my DeLongi grinder died. It would reduce the coffee to a cocoa powder consistancy, and now I have to get Starbucks to do this for me. With the right espresso grind, there should be no grit.
Hunt
Reply to
Hunt

Well, in this case, on a really hot grill I think the grounds actually seem to burn, and so there's a crust on the meat underneath. I don't really work off the bits that are really stuck, just the looser ones. I think next time I'll go with Hunt's plan, and ask a coffee merchant to give me the finest grind possible (and save the coffee just for this recipe).Before I was using a home grinder.
Reply to
DaleW

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