TN: Oldest Grignolino I've had (by about 50 years)

With veal cutlets under arugula/radicchio/onion salad and pasta, the 1962 Fontanafredda Grignolino. Clean short cork, came out easy (used Durand but wouldn't have needed to). Very pale at first, color deepened a bit. Pretty awful nose at first pour, but seemed to settle. First taste quite acrid. Was debating opening something else, decided to give it a try. By dinner time a different wine. Some fruit- very tart raspberry/cranberry, but more spice and citrus than real red fruit. Actually it reminded me of the "Russian tea" my mom made in the 50s (included I think Tang, cloves, and cinnamon). Got pretty perfumey and floral with time. I'm a known lover of older wines (what some consider dead) but Betsy actually liked this. No one would ever describe it as young, fresh, or fruit-driven, but it had character. I'm mostly used to the more modern style of Grignolino, but I think the grape itself is quite tannic, and apparently the old ones (not made to emulate glou glou wines) can age. Fun to try (and wasn't expensive). Probably really a B/B-, but I give it B++ because it was unusual, showed some different faces over a few hours, and it?s 58 year old Grignolino.
Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent wine, B a good wine, C drinkable. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a party where it was only choice.Furthermore, I offer no promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.
Reply to
DaleW
very tart raspberry/cranberry, but more spice and citrus than real red fruit. Actually it reminded me of the "Russian tea" my mom made in the 50s (included I think Tang, cloves, and cinnamon).
Don't know how I wrote that, wasn't around in 50s, meant 1970s
Reply to
DaleW

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