Plum Wine Color

I have a plum wine fermenting that has a fairly decent red color. A bit deeper than strawberry, not as deep as cherry. This surprises me as most of my reading didn't lead in this direction for color.
The plums were not subjected to hot or boiling water to set a color as I didn't expect any color other than usual yellow or yellow-orange.
How delicate is this color, what can I do to keep it red?
BTW it sure tastes nice.
Steve - Noobie Oregon
Reply to
spud
Hi there Newbie myself and I also have a gallon of plum wine in secondary right now. It has the same delicate red color that you describe. Not sure of the variety of the plums but there are the common purple skin plums that grow here in Québec. I didn`t really expect a different color as I haven't read anything that suggested me a different color. Marc "spud" a écrit dans le message de news:3qbaq09g9q5jmkpp64ak9j693qh4qm1v4j@4ax.com... > I have a plum wine fermenting that has a fairly decent red color. A > bit deeper than strawberry, not as deep as cherry. This surprises me > as most of my reading didn't lead in this direction for color. > > The plums were not subjected to hot or boiling water to set a color as > I didn't expect any color other than usual yellow or yellow-orange. > > How delicate is this color, what can I do to keep it red? > > BTW it sure tastes nice. > > Steve - Noobie > Oregon > > >
Reply to
Marc
Hi Marc: I got the yellow-orange idea from searching this ng's archives. There was al bit of a dicussuion of a red color to plum wine, more of a strawberry intensity that the deeper red this batch I have is showing. Another post dicussed boiling the skins to extract color then adding it to the fermenting must. IIRC this person seemed to think this technique had no effect on the flavor of the finished wine though.... So did you use boiling water or cold soak to get your red? I didn't and just get a feeling looking at it that it might be short lived. I'd like to keep the red if possible, place in a dark enviornment, bottlein dark bottles, etc. Anything else that can help preserve the color you know of? Steve - Noobie Oregon >Hi there > >Newbie myself and I also have a gallon of plum wine in secondary right now. >It has the same delicate red color that you describe. Not sure of the >variety of the plums but there are the common purple skin plums that grow >here in Québec. I didn`t really expect a different color as I haven't read >anything that suggested me a different color. > >Marc > > >"spud" a écrit dans le message de >news:3qbaq09g9q5jmkpp64ak9j693qh4qm1v4j@4ax.com... >> I have a plum wine fermenting that has a fairly decent red color. A >> bit deeper than strawberry, not as deep as cherry. This surprises me >> as most of my reading didn't lead in this direction for color. >> >> The plums were not subjected to hot or boiling water to set a color as >> I didn't expect any color other than usual yellow or yellow-orange. >> >> How delicate is this color, what can I do to keep it red? >> >> BTW it sure tastes nice. >> >> Steve - Noobie >> Oregon >> >> >> >
Reply to
spud
I just froze the plums for about 3 weeks, then removed the pits and mashed them a bit. Since they got frozen, they almost turn into a purée by themselves after defrost. I just poured boiling water on them and fermented it for about a week before transfering into secondary. No special treatment for color extraction. I suppose the freezing operation and the pectic enzymes added to the must has something to with it. If there are ways to fix the color of a wine, I'm not aware of them yet, but I sure would like to hear about it. But can a wine loose its color over time ? I don't know about that either.
Marc
Reply to
Marc
Hi Marc: From what I've read using boiling water as you did helps sets the color of some wines. I cut and pitted the plums then froze them. I didn't use boiling water though for the soak. Just tap water along with the usual additions. So it seems we may have an experiement of sorts between you and I for plum color. The routines sound enough alike with the exception of adding the water. Do plums need boiling water to set the color? How much plum did you use and how's it's flavor so far. Are you making a dry table wine or do you intend to sweeten you wine. The batch I have is still in the primary, going to dry, but it sure is good, so far. I removed the skins after 4 days, there was enough tannin in it by then to get a decent pucker but not so much as to take for ever to age. I used 20lbs. of plums and 1/2lbs. of raisins for 3 gallons. Take Care, Steve - Noobie Oregon >I just froze the plums for about 3 weeks, then removed the pits and mashed >them a bit. Since they got frozen, they almost turn into a purée by >themselves after defrost. I just poured boiling water on them and fermented >it for about a week before transfering into secondary. No special treatment >for color extraction. I suppose the freezing operation and the pectic >enzymes added to the must has something to with it. If there are ways to >fix the color of a wine, I'm not aware of them yet, but I sure would like to >hear about it. But can a wine loose its color over time ? I don't know >about that either. > >Marc >
Reply to
spud
> I just froze the plums for about 3 weeks, then removed the pits and mashed > them a bit. Since they got frozen, they almost turn into a purée by > themselves after defrost. I just poured boiling water on them and fermented > it for about a week before transfering into secondary. No special treatment > for color extraction. I suppose the freezing operation and the pectic > enzymes added to the must has something to with it. If there are ways to > fix the color of a wine, I'm not aware of them yet, but I sure would like to > hear about it. But can a wine loose its color over time ? VERY definitely. That is why wine should be kept away from oxygen and light. There is no oxygen or light in your stomach. You know what you have to do.... I don't know > about that either. > > Marc > >
Reply to
Bob
Lol. From what I had read from those who have been at this longer than I have; certain fruit wines can lose their color. I try to avoid this by keeping the carboys covered and away from light as much as possible. I also try to keep my wines in a dark place, away from light - I usually do this by covering my wine racks with something like a towel, sheet, etc.. I did convert an old entertainment center to wine storage, by putting my wine racks in it, and then rigging a curtain rod on the front so that the curtains cover the whole front of the entertainment center. Darlene > > "Marc" wrote in message > news:A8tpd.14278$eJ.263982@wagner.videotron.net... >> I just froze the plums for about 3 weeks, then removed the pits and >> mashed >> them a bit. Since they got frozen, they almost turn into a purée by >> themselves after defrost. I just poured boiling water on them and > fermented >> it for about a week before transfering into secondary. No special > treatment >> for color extraction. I suppose the freezing operation and the pectic >> enzymes added to the must has something to with it. If there are ways to >> fix the color of a wine, I'm not aware of them yet, but I sure would like > to >> hear about it. But can a wine loose its color over time ? > > > VERY definitely. That is why wine should be kept away from oxygen and > light. There is no oxygen or light in your stomach. You know what you have > to do.... > > > > I don't know >> about that either. >> >> Marc >> >> > >
Reply to
Dar V
Hi Dar V: Do you have plans for cranberry wine this year? I've seen some attractive prices on cranberry in the stores last week. Can you get them fresh were you are. We can't, the drive to the bogs is 4 hours and part of the fun of making wine, I think, is scrouging and making decent wine on the cheap. The gas to there would kill the cheap part. Last year we made one with 2lbs. per gallon cranberry and 1lbs raisin per gallon. It turned out to light in flavor and too high in alcohol. So we thought to try 3lbs. per gallon with the raisins and keep the SG at 1.095 or less. Anyway I hope you're having a good holiday. Steve - Noobie Oregon >Darlene wrote >Lol. From what I had read from those who have been at this longer than I >have; certain fruit wines can lose their color. I try to avoid this by >keeping the carboys covered and away from light as much as possible. I also >try to keep my wines in a dark place, away from light - I usually do this by >covering my wine racks with something like a towel, sheet, etc.. I did >convert an old entertainment center to wine storage, by putting my wine >racks in it, and then rigging a curtain rod on the front so that the >curtains cover the whole front of the entertainment center. >Darlene >
Reply to
spud
Steve, Yes, I do have plans for cranberry wine. I usually wait until after Thanksgiving, when they usually go on sale and buy them. They look pretty fresh, but I'm too far away to pick them from a bog. Then, I throw them into the freezer for a few months to break the fruit down before I make my wine. The cranberry wine we had this Thanksgiving was a batch I made in 2002 at 12% Alcohol by volume. I shoot for a starting SG of 1.090 (close to yours) - otherwise you have to wait a long time for the wine to smooth out. Rocket fuel...ah yes...been there, but I'm learning. Good-luck. Darlene Wisconsin > Hi Dar V: > > Do you have plans for cranberry wine this year? I've seen some > attractive prices on cranberry in the stores last week. Can you get > them fresh were you are. We can't, the drive to the bogs is 4 hours > and part of the fun of making wine, I think, is scrouging and making > decent wine on the cheap. The gas to there would kill the cheap part. > > Last year we made one with 2lbs. per gallon cranberry and 1lbs raisin > per gallon. It turned out to light in flavor and too high in alcohol. > > So we thought to try 3lbs. per gallon with the raisins and keep the SG > at 1.095 or less. > > Anyway I hope you're having a good holiday. > > Steve - Noobie > Oregon > > > > > >>Darlene wrote >>Lol. From what I had read from those who have been at this longer than I >>have; certain fruit wines can lose their color. I try to avoid this by >>keeping the carboys covered and away from light as much as possible. I >>also >>try to keep my wines in a dark place, away from light - I usually do this >>by >>covering my wine racks with something like a towel, sheet, etc.. I did >>convert an old entertainment center to wine storage, by putting my wine >>racks in it, and then rigging a curtain rod on the front so that the >>curtains cover the whole front of the entertainment center. >>Darlene >> >
Reply to
Dar V
Does freezing fruits for months have an advantage over freezing for days?? It would seem to me that once the fuit is frozen the cell walls are broken and extended time would have no advantage. Just curious. Thanks > Steve, > Yes, I do have plans for cranberry wine. I usually wait until after > Thanksgiving, when they usually go on sale and buy them. They look pretty > fresh, but I'm too far away to pick them from a bog. Then, I throw them > into the freezer for a few months to break the fruit down before I make my > wine. The cranberry wine we had this Thanksgiving was a batch I made in > 2002 at 12% Alcohol by volume. I shoot for a starting SG of 1.090 (close > to yours) - otherwise you have to wait a long time for the wine to smooth > out. Rocket fuel...ah yes...been there, but I'm learning. Good-luck. > Darlene > Wisconsin > > "spud" wrote in message > news:0frhq0lv460utb458cughidts2fubo0rrp@4ax.com... >> Hi Dar V: >> >> Do you have plans for cranberry wine this year? I've seen some >> attractive prices on cranberry in the stores last week. Can you get >> them fresh were you are. We can't, the drive to the bogs is 4 hours >> and part of the fun of making wine, I think, is scrouging and making >> decent wine on the cheap. The gas to there would kill the cheap part. >> >> Last year we made one with 2lbs. per gallon cranberry and 1lbs raisin >> per gallon. It turned out to light in flavor and too high in alcohol. >> >> So we thought to try 3lbs. per gallon with the raisins and keep the SG >> at 1.095 or less. >> >> Anyway I hope you're having a good holiday. >> >> Steve - Noobie >> Oregon >> >> >> >> >> >>>Darlene wrote >>>Lol. From what I had read from those who have been at this longer than I >>>have; certain fruit wines can lose their color. I try to avoid this by >>>keeping the carboys covered and away from light as much as possible. I >>>also >>>try to keep my wines in a dark place, away from light - I usually do this >>>by >>>covering my wine racks with something like a towel, sheet, etc.. I did >>>convert an old entertainment center to wine storage, by putting my wine >>>racks in it, and then rigging a curtain rod on the front so that the >>>curtains cover the whole front of the entertainment center. >>>Darlene >>> >> > >
Reply to
gwoolam
I've been an avid gardener for more than 20 years and I have a big freezer to put the excess in. I've noticed that when I freeze a whole bunch of say strawberries or zucchini, that if I open a quart up after about a month of being frozen, that it is pretty much like it was when I froze it. If I open something up after it has been frozen 6 months or longer, it has broken down further. I can also say "yes" there is something to freezer burn for certain things; so you can freeze things too long. I think it all depends on the item you are freezing and some you should not freeze. Watermelon will not benefit from freezing. I prefer to freeze most fruits or veggies for at least a month before I make wine out of it, but at the same time I don't worry if I freeze something for 6 months and then make wine out of it. I prefer to freeze pumpkin for a bit because that is so hard to begin with. I think zucchini benefits from 6 months of freezing, because I always get a lot of liquid from it after its been frozen that long - I think my wine will be better for it. There are some who believe only a week or so, and it'll be fine; and they are right, it does break down a bit in that week.... Darlene ;o) Wisconsin > Does freezing fruits for months have an advantage over freezing for days?? > It would seem to me that once the fuit is frozen the cell walls are broken > and extended time would have no advantage. Just curious. > > Thanks > > "Dar V" wrote in message > news:pguqd.421$NO5.392@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com... >> Steve, >> Yes, I do have plans for cranberry wine. I usually wait until after >> Thanksgiving, when they usually go on sale and buy them. They look >> pretty fresh, but I'm too far away to pick them from a bog. Then, I >> throw them into the freezer for a few months to break the fruit down >> before I make my wine. The cranberry wine we had this Thanksgiving was a >> batch I made in 2002 at 12% Alcohol by volume. I shoot for a starting SG >> of 1.090 (close to yours) - otherwise you have to wait a long time for >> the wine to smooth out. Rocket fuel...ah yes...been there, but I'm >> learning. Good-luck. >> Darlene >> Wisconsin >> >> "spud" wrote in message >> news:0frhq0lv460utb458cughidts2fubo0rrp@4ax.com... >>> Hi Dar V: >>> >>> Do you have plans for cranberry wine this year? I've seen some >>> attractive prices on cranberry in the stores last week. Can you get >>> them fresh were you are. We can't, the drive to the bogs is 4 hours >>> and part of the fun of making wine, I think, is scrouging and making >>> decent wine on the cheap. The gas to there would kill the cheap part. >>> >>> Last year we made one with 2lbs. per gallon cranberry and 1lbs raisin >>> per gallon. It turned out to light in flavor and too high in alcohol. >>> >>> So we thought to try 3lbs. per gallon with the raisins and keep the SG >>> at 1.095 or less. >>> >>> Anyway I hope you're having a good holiday. >>> >>> Steve - Noobie >>> Oregon >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>>>Darlene wrote >>>>Lol. From what I had read from those who have been at this longer than >>>>I >>>>have; certain fruit wines can lose their color. I try to avoid this by >>>>keeping the carboys covered and away from light as much as possible. I >>>>also >>>>try to keep my wines in a dark place, away from light - I usually do >>>>this by >>>>covering my wine racks with something like a towel, sheet, etc.. I did >>>>convert an old entertainment center to wine storage, by putting my wine >>>>racks in it, and then rigging a curtain rod on the front so that the >>>>curtains cover the whole front of the entertainment center. >>>>Darlene >>>> >>> >> >> > >
Reply to
Dar V
> Does freezing fruits for months have an advantage over freezing for days?? > It would seem to me that once the fuit is frozen the cell walls are broken > and extended time would have no advantage. Just curious.
There's not really an advantage. Darlene is right that the fruit does deteriorate with time. The lower the temperature, the slow the rate. Various studies have shown that the freezing of fruit juices at temperatures below –18 C (0 F) preserves the flavours of the juice almost perfectly.
Darlene also mentioned freezer burn. This is due to oxygen exposure, and does not directly have anything to do with freezing duration.
Ben Improved Winemaking
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Reply to
Ben Rotter
> From what I've read using boiling water as you did helps sets the > color of some wines. > Do plums need boiling water to set the color?
I find it hard to believe this claim. I've never done a controlled experiment, and I haven't heard of anyone else doing so either, but I don't see why colour would be "set" by heat. I suspect fruit quantity and use of pectin enzymes play a far more significant role in colour extraction.
As far as maintaining colour is concerned: *avoiding light exposure is critical and good advice *minimising SO2 additions is important - as SO2 bleaches colour *avoiding oxidation is also helpful
HTH, Ben
Improved Winemaking
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Reply to
Ben Rotter
>>spud wrote >> From what I've read using boiling water as you did helps sets the >> color of some wines. >> Do plums need boiling water to set the color? >I find it hard to believe this claim. I've never done a controlled >experiment, and I haven't heard of anyone else doing so either, but I >don't see why colour would be "set" by heat. I suspect fruit quantity >and use of pectin enzymes play a far more significant role in colour >extraction. > >As far as maintaining colour is concerned: >*avoiding light exposure is critical and good advice >*minimising SO2 additions is important - as SO2 bleaches colour >*avoiding oxidation is also helpful > >HTH, >Ben
Thanks
Steve - Noobie Oregon
Reply to
spud
> > Does freezing fruits for months have an advantage over freezing for days?? > > It would seem to me that once the fuit is frozen the cell walls are broken > > and extended time would have no advantage. Just curious. > > There's not really an advantage. Darlene is right that the fruit does > deteriorate with time. The lower the temperature, the slow the rate. > Various studies have shown that the freezing of fruit juices at > temperatures below -18 C (0 F) preserves the flavours of the juice > almost perfectly. > > Darlene also mentioned freezer burn. This is due to oxygen exposure, > and does not directly have anything to do with freezing duration. It does if the freezer is frost-free and constantly defrosting and refreezing the outermost layer of fruit. > > Ben > Improved Winemaking >
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B0B

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