storing dried yeast


If I use dried yeast from one of those hermetically sealed foil packets but don't use the entire packet, can that yeast be stored and used later?
How should it be stored? Refrigerator? Freezer?
What might be effects on my fermented product be if the opened yeast packet is stored too long?
Thanks
Reply to
abe865fdecdefg235726816

Just keep in the fridge in a safe place where the packet won't get crushed or puctured. There are dates on most packets, mine have been out as far as 2008.
Reply to
Dan Logcher

"abe865fdecdefg235726816"
I think you should toss it. It isn't so expensive that you really want to take a chance on it later. But, if you really want to keep it around, wrap in tightly in plastic (Saran, et al) wrap and put it in the freezer.
Reply to
Casey Wilson

i keep mine in a tupperware-like container in the fridge.
but that begs to ask a few other questions. how cold is too cold? should i store open packages in the same container as unopened ones? am i overthinking this once again? should i skip step two?
Reply to
Tater

"abe865fdecdefg235726816"
I have used a half packet, just wrapped up the remainder with a rubber band tightly in the refrigerator, and used it successfully within a few weeks. The way I pitch my yeast I can easily tell within a few hours if it is going to become active. I have tried reconstituting in water, water with sugar and nutrients, part of the must with all of the above, and still not had good results. I simply sprinkle the yeast across the surface of the must. This has never failed me. It gets plenty of oxygen at the start and I can see very quickly if the yeast has life in it...
Quixote
Reply to
Quixote

You can, but I wouldn't reuse it. I've known people to have their beer get infected by doing that. It's cheap, just buy more.
Refrigerator
--------->Denny -- Life begins at 60...1.060, that is.
Reply to
Denny Conn

I've only used dry yeast a few times, and just used the whole pack. You want the most yeast you can to get a good strong fermentation started. The only times I've had open packages is when I've made soda. I just put the opened pack in a zip top bag and stuck it back in the fridge for another batch (actually a few) of soda. If you make bread, you could add it to your bread yeast. I've done this a few times. Otherwise, dry yeast is cheap, so just toss it out. Cheers,
Reply to
DragonTail

"abe865fdecdefg235726816"
Yeah, you can use a partial pack, it works for me. As a matter of fact, I just used the second half of a pack of Nottingham that I opened 6 months ago for my latest batch, and it turned out just fine. When you first open the packet, just be careful and don't play around with the inside of the packet, to minimize any risk of contamination. Use whatever amount you need, then fold over the open end of the packet and tape it shut, and keep it in the fridge. It will probably keep for a year or two. Dry yeast is so cool like that.
Reply to
David M. Taylor

I have to if I want to use Nottingham. The LHB suppliers don't sell it so I have to buy 500g packs direct from Lallemand who have a sales office in my city. To date, haven't had an infection yet. Steve W (in Aus)
Reply to
Steve/Aus

Why not use the whole packet?
I store unopened packets in the fridge. I guess you could store a partially used one the same way. Try to close it back up (or put it in a ziplock bag, etc) and put it in the fridge.
If you store them too long the viability goes way down (the yeast starts to die) and you can have problems with the fermentation. IMO, using a partial packet isn't a good idea anyway unless you're making really small batches. A partial packet is already going to be under pitching before you take into account any viability issues. The standard packet size is around 10 grams, and is designed for a 5 gallon batch. Even if you're doing something like 3 gallon batches, I'd still use the whole packet. Dry yeast is so cheap that trying to split a single packet up doesn't seem worth the trouble.
John.
Reply to
John 'Shaggy' Kolesar

The companies usually say not to freeze them. However, I've kept packets in the freezer before and it didn't seem to hurt them as far as I could tell. I switched to keeping them in the fridge though.
I don't think it makes any difference.
John.
Reply to
John 'Shaggy' Kolesar

I'd feel comfortable storing it for up to a year, but I'd start to get a little concerned after that. I've only had dry yeast fail to start on me a couple of times, but the most recent was a packet that had been in the fridge somewhere around 1-2 years. I didn't do much brewing after we had our kids, and these were sitting around in the fridge when I started back up. I don't know the exact timeframe, but it was in the ballpark of a couple years.
IMO, there's definitely a point where viability becomes an issue. Doubly so if you're trying to get away with using partial packets.
John.
Reply to
John 'Shaggy' Kolesar

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.