Brewing Solvent - Page 2

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Re: Brewing Solvent



Aiki Apostate wrote:
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http://www.crosby-baker.com/TrueBrew.htm#The%20True%20Brew%20Maestro%20Equipment%20Kit
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Yeah, I'm thinking the same thing, except that I have a friend who
works for Publix, and I'm hoping he can get those wide rolls that they
use in the meat and deli departments! Also, I'm a little worried about
using my bottling bucket as a primary. I like the idea of having a
spigot so I don't have to siphon, but what about nasties getting into
the spigot while I'm on primary fermentation? Thanks for you input!


Re: Brewing Solvent



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I often primary in a bucket with a spigot... while getting ready to
transfer or bottle, I set the bucket up on the sink and rinse the spigot
and then let some sanitizer sit in it (upside down) while I do other
things... then rinse again.  I've had no problems with that procedure.

Note that I've seen posts where some folks have a short piece of tubing
that is closed on one end somehow (heat, glue, ?) and they sanitize that
and stick it over the sipgot during fermentation.

My main problem with spigots and fermentation is they they often have
slow leaks/drips, etc.  Not a big problem, but annoying and messy.

Just a couple thoughts.

Derric


Re: Brewing Solvent



Derric wrote:
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Thank you for the info, and others if I miss anybody! I used to brew
before, nothing much, just extract, but I want to step it up a few
notches. And in order to do that, I want to make the experience as
comfortable as possible, without worrying like an old lady about every
nitpicking thing! I want to learn how to easily all grain, and keg, too!


Re: Brewing Solvent



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Do you have a glass secondary?  Many consider it good to get the beer off
the spent yeast and other solids that settle our during primary fermentation
as they can contribute to "off" flavors.  Additionally your primary
fermenter (and bottling bucket) are gas permeable which means you may not
want to let the beer sit in them any longer than necessary as your brew can
oxidize in them a bit.....another potential "off" flavor.

The clear plastic wrap is really only a way to avoid fiddling with an
airlock......which is not all that much of a hassle anyway.

With or without the new plastic wrap technique I would not conduct primary
fermentation in your bottling bucket.   Bottling requires the addition of
priming sugar (which should be gently stirred in) which will raise all the
solids that have settled out during primary fermentation.  So in either
case, you are going to need to rack over to a separate bottling bucket (or a
glass fermenter for aging) to avoid putting all those solids back into
suspsension and into your beer bottles.

Anatabaka



Re: Brewing Solvent


I think I may have misread your question....for some reason I thought you
were planning to bottle directly from the primary.  I'm the dunce....not
you!!

Now that I've re-read your question I'd second the opinion that many spigots
leak anyway so the bottling bucket may not be the best primary.  There's
also the issue of clearing any solids and keeping the spigot
sanitized....overall not the best option IMO

Have you seen the Fermtech siphon?  It's pretty simple and makes the
siphoning process pretty easy.  http://www.fermtech.on.ca/


Re: Brewing Solvent



Anatabaka wrote:
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Nah, not a dunce! In my case, sometimes what I read just doesn't quite
get to the brain!!
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Yeah, think I'll steer clear of the bottling bucket.
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Thanks. I'll see if they have one at my local shop first!

While I have your attention, I've got a red ale that fermented great
for three days in primary, then slowed. The fourth day I racked to
secondary. It's been in secondary for week, and just doesn't seem to be
clearing. If you flashlight through the secondary, it just doesn't look
clear. Is there concern, or am I just over reacting?


Re: Brewing Solvent


Snip

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Probably over reacting.  First, I've never been convinced that a clearer
beer is necessarily a better beer.  In some cases I actually prefer the more
handcrafted or rustic look of a slightly cloudy beer.  Second, certain beer
styles actually seek to be cloudy (though perhaps not your red ale) and the
suspended yeasts contribute to the desired flavor profile of the beer.
Lastly, there are many factors that might be contributing to your beers
failur to clarify.  Haze can be caused by a shortened protein rest, high
grain temperature, incomplete conversion, incomplete hot break, insufficient
cold break, or even bacterial infection.  Most of these will not likely have
a significant impact on flavor....at least not to the point of making it
undrinkable....excepting infection of course.

If you've hit your targe F.G. and are ready to bottle then I'd go ahead
without too much concern.  Most likely you have a pretty decent red ale
waiting in the wings.

Anatabaka



Re: Brewing Solvent



Anatabaka wrote:
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Thanks, man. I'll let you know how it turned out. I'm hoping NOT an
infection. It was an extract and adjunct grain brew, btw. I've got to
get all grain brewing figured out!


Re: Brewing Solvent



Anatabaka wrote:
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Oh, I wouldn't leave it in the bottling bucket! What I meant was to
primary ferment in the bottling bucket instead of the fermenting bucket
so that I'd have a spigot to then rack to my carboy and secondary
ferment. Then, at bottling time, the bottling bucket would be clean!
BUT, I've since purchased Fertech's auto-siphon, and it works like a
champ! Now, here's the question of the day I have!! Would it do any
harm, when making a five gallon batch, to put in enough water to have 5
1/2 gallons to start in the primary? I always end up with right around
4 1/2 gallons after racking and leaving trub behind. Or should I just
stick with what I end up with? Thank!


Re: Brewing Solvent




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You can add more water, but it will lower your OG.  for example if you
have an OG of 1.060 in 4.5 gal, it will become 1.049 in 5.5 gal.  Your
color will also become a bit lighter and the IBUs of the hops will
drop.  If you are brewing from a kit, you can try to increase the
fermentables to account for this, but then you will need to increase
the hops accordingly as well.  If you are creating your own recipes
then just change your fermented volume to 5.5 gal.  I always design my
recipes to have 5.5 gal in the primary so that I can rack close to 5
gal to the secondary.  To design a recipe or alter an existing recipe
try www.hbd.org/recipator.  Its free and a great source for recipe
calculations.  You can even enter your kit ingredients in there (if you
know it) and note the OG and IBUs.  Then adjust fermenter volume and
tweak the recipe by adding more malt extract and hops to get back to te
same numbers.  Add the malt first because the IBUs are affected by the
gravity of the boil.


Re: Brewing Solvent



Brian wrote:
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Brian, thanks for the excellent advice! I've downloaded the recipe
designer, and am going to use it to do just as you do, think in terms
of 5.5 instead of 5.0. I think I tend to lose a tad more than some
others might, because I want to keep as much trub as possible out. Do
you do all grain the same way? I'm going to work into all grain, but it
seems like there are a million things to learn!


Re: Brewing Solvent




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I have about 5 AG batches under my belt, so I am still learning about
AG.  In general I plan for 5.5 gal to the fermenter and I leave very
little behind in the boil kettle.  I know in theory you should try and
leave the break amterial behind, but I always get greedy and try and
get as much wort as possible ito the fermenter.  It all settles out in
the primary and I lave it behind when I rack to secondary.  Using glass
for both primary and secondary I can see the layer and do a good job of
leaving it all behind.  If a little gets to the secondary its no big
deal as it will settle out there as well and then I'll get rid of even
more when I rack to the keg.

Personally my advice to you is continue to refine your processes with
extract and try to move up to full boil batches (boil 6-6.5 gal of
extract so you end up with 5.5 gal of wort) and figure out things like
the evaporation rate of your kettle.  Once the process is reliable and
you feel you've learned all there is to learn on extract, then step up
to all grain.  You'll be introducing many new variables to the equation
by mashing, so its best to the basics of brewing well understood from
the extract days.

I'd have to say that the biggest improvements I've seen in my beers
were due to the following (in order roughly):
1.  Chiller - I built an immersion chiller and getting a good cold
break has made my beers much clearer and cleaner tasting.  Its
basically a requirement for full boils as it takes a LONG time to cool
a full 5 gallons in a ice bath.
2.  Fermentation Fridge - I acquired a small fridge and bought a temp
control for it.  Controling the temp of the fermentation made a HUGE
difference in the quality of ales and now allows lagers.
3.  Full Boils - In order to go all grain you will need to boil the
entire runoff at once which will usually be in the neighborhood of 6
gal.  Bigger beers will have more to bouil as you need to concentrate
the wort.  For extract batches, larger boils prevent scorching and make
for better hop utilization.  It also tends to give a cleaner taste
because all of the water was boiled and went through the hot and cold
break stages.
4.  All Grain - Going to All grain made a differnece in flavor by
gettign rid of the extract 'tang', but not a mojor difference.  The
part I like is I can now control exactly (more or less) how fermentable
the wort will be.  Mash at a low temp and the beer will be dryer, high
temp, more body, etc.  As a bonus, its cheaper too!


Re: Brewing Solvent



Brian wrote:
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Thanks for the advice! I understand that all grain is almost half the
price of extract! How big of a brewpot do you have for full 6 gal.
batches? I've got an outdoor type deep fry burner I plan to use instead
of the stove, just need to get a pot big enough to do full boils. From
what I understand is that even with extracts, the quality goes up with
a full boil. Thanks for your time!


Re: Brewing Solvent



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Well, I'd just say a 10 gallon pot... here's why: since you usually
do an hour to 1.5 hour boil and most pots evaporate about a gallon an
hour, if you want 6 gallons at the end of the boil you'll need to boil
about 7.5 gallons.  Allowing some room for foaming, stirring, etc, 10
gallons isn't too big.  I got a 10 gallon heavy duty aluminum pot from
a restaurant supply for about $75.


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Probably.  It certainly can be lighter in color.  The hops extraction is better
as well (the less dense the wort, the more extraction).

Derric


Re: Brewing Solvent



Derric wrote:
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Cool, thanks, I'll look into it. I thought that I'd read somewhere,
perhaps the new complete joy of homebrewing, that aluminum wasn't good
for boiling wort? If I'm screwed up, my local Bass Pro Shops has some
aluminum pots that big. I have a stainless 4 gallon one now, but it
seems as though because of the thin bottom, I have to stir the heck out
of it when I put in liquid malt extract. Maybe it just seems like it,
but it feels like it sticks to the bottom.


Re: Brewing Solvent


On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 13:13:09 -0800, basskisser wrote:

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Oh, no! Not this again!

No, it's a myth. There is no problem cooking/brewing with aluminum.

--
            Falcon's Rest
          Zymurgical Alchemy
   First Inter-Galactic Guild House Of
The Brotherhood Of St. Cathode Of Anode


Re: Brewing Solvent



Anatabaka wrote:
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Bottled Saturday, and warm and uncarbonated it still tasted great! I
think as I shined a flashlight through the carboy, it appeared hazier
(if that's a word!) than it was. Looks great in the bucket and bottle!


Re: Brewing Solvent



Anatabaka wrote:
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Yes, I do have a glass carboy as a secondary.
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True, but less pieces to sanatize!
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Good points all, thanks!


Re: Brewing Solvent




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I use glass carboys for primary (6.5 gal) and secondary(5 gal).  I just
cover the neck with a piece of aluminum foil and it works fine.
There's no room in my fermentation fridge for an airlock.


Re: Brewing Solvent



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bother
the
stops
when the

Some people just throw a tower over the fermenter to keep the bugs out.

Bob



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