Ginger Beer

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How easy is it to make Ginger Beer? Also, how would I carbonate it?

If somebody could point me to a good recipe it would be much appreciated.

BTW, not looking to make this alcoholic - just something for the kids :D

Thanks,
Simon



Re: Ginger Beer



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I bought a can of extract the other day for this, it says to make
non-alcoholic you don't add sugar, I think this produces a very low
alcohol rather than none though.  It'll be down to your discretion if
that's too much for your kids.

As for carbonation, I'd do it the usual way and accept the bit of
alcohol that results.  I did a bit of trawling around for recipes and
I've seen a few that recomend bottling very quickly so the primary
fermentation runs in the bottle and carbonates.  That strikes me as a
bit dangerous, you'd want to make sure you've worked out how much
more fermentation will happen with that method.

I've just gone and found the can, it says for non-alcoholic:

add 4L of hot water, can and 150g of raw sugar, disolve

top up to 23L

when it's 35C or below vigorously stir in yeast and nutrient

seal and leave for 2 to 3 hours then bottle

stir gently before bottling, do not add sugar to bottles, store for a
minimum of 3 weeks before drinking

For alcoholic it's more or less a normal ferment, 1kg of raw sugar, 1
week in the fermenter, primed bottles.

Now that I've read the instruction the non-alcoholic method sounds a
bit safer, you know how much fermentable material will be in there,
the 2-3hrs will just be to let the yeast breed a bit.  I wonder about
their 35C maximum, sounds a bit high.

peter

Re: Ginger Beer


Thanks for that info.

From some of the recipes I've seen online it is basically water, sugar,
yeast and root ginger. If I was to make this alcoholic, I would basically
make in the same way as I would normal beer? Do I need a kit or would I be
good making it from scratch using these ingredients?

I guess that the less sugar you put in, the less alcoholic? How about the
amount of yeast?

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Re: Ginger Beer


shred about 6 ounces of fresh ginger root
boil about 2 hours in a big stock pot with about 2 gallons of water in it

non sugar
well this gets tougher if you want lower than low alcohol
corn sugars are probably the best bet.
dextrose is not so sweet either

process it at 10 degrees below boiling

if sunlight is ever seen by your batch, it will go skunk on you.
neon is not your friend either.

your favorite beer supply shop has special low grade yeast sachets.
well making your own ginger ALE is actually an art.
low temperatures are always preferred.
if the kids start bouncing against the wall,
then ya just happen to be a lucky guy.

since you will devise your own concept
look to google and get a recipe
simple easy
but ya got the basics

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Re: Ginger Beer


On Tue, 10 May 2005 19:01:45 +0000 (UTC), "PieOPah"

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Hi Simon

When I was very young (a long time ago in a Galaxy....etc.) we used to
make very nice ginger beer from a ginger beer plant.  I no longer have
the recipe but the following, found on the WWW, looks identical:-

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Equipment and Ingredients

Equipment
A jar and lid, which is big enough to contain the plant.
One pint-sized measuring jug
Several clean and dry two-litre plastic bottles.
Teaspoons
A large pan
A muslin cloth for straining the plant

Ingredients
Dried (powdered) ginger
Dried brewers yeast
Sugar
Juice of four lemons
Water

Making the Plant
The plant is a mixture of dried ginger, yeast, sugar and water. This
creates a yeast culture.

In the jar, place one teaspoon of dried yeast, two teaspoons of dried
ginger, four teaspoons of sugar and a (UK size) pint of cold water.

Stir and keep at room temperature.

Feed the plant every day with two teaspoons of dried ginger and four
teaspoons of sugar. Stir after feeding.

The plant will be ready after one week.

Making the Ginger Beer
Place 1kg (2lb) of sugar and two pints of boiling water in the large
pan. The sugar will dissolve.

Add the juice of the four lemons to the pan.

Strain the contents of the jar - the plant - through the cloth into
the pan. See below for what is to be done with the solid portion of
the plant.

Add 14 pints of room temperature water.

Stir and bottle. Fill the bottles about seven-eighths full as you need
to allow for expansion. Squeeze the air out of the bottles to stop
them exploding under pressure from their contents.

Store the bottles in a safe place at room temperature, and leave for
three to four weeks to 'brew'.

You can divide The "plant" sediment left on the muslin into two parts.
Put each part into a clean jar with a cupful of cold water. The plants
are then ready to be fed again. Give one to a friend.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
A few points:-

This is a UK recipe so pints mean UK sized pints; i.e. larger than US
pints.

I was probably pre-teenage when I used to make this (under parental
supervision) and as far as I am aware it is non-alcoholic (or very
low).  Certainly everybody regarded it as being fit for children to
drink - and they can do most of the work (certainly the daily feeding)
themselves.

I seem to remember the bottles having a tendency to explode - but that
could have been my own fault.  We also used to use glass bottles with
a screw top in those days.

As you can see from the recipe, you end up with lots of ginger beer
plus 2 more plants, so you could end up being inundated with the
stuff.

Regards

KGB


Re: Ginger Beer


This sounds exactly what I am after. Many thanks :D

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Re: Ginger Beer


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Yup, did the same.

Like all good fermented things, it improves immensely with age. Patience is
well rewarded if it can be left to mature for a few months.

Mike



Re: Ginger Beer



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I made up a kit ginger beer out of a can.  (what's the proper way to
say that, is that extract brewing?)  Anyway, I bottled it yesterday
after 10ish days in the fermenter.  The point of the story is that I
kept 2L aside and just put it in the fridge and had a couple of glasses
last night, quite tasty.  I'll let the rest age and carbonate a bit
though.  I was just keen.

peter

Re: Ginger Beer


I am still feeding my plant but am due to bottle tomorrow evening. I
have cut down on quantites since I don't have quite so many PET
bottles. Will be getting more for next time (providing this is
successfull)

Rather than starting the plant off again straight away, what would be
the best way of storing? Can it be frozen or could it survive just left
in the fridge?


Re: Ginger Beer


Mike wrote:
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Can yo please re-post the link or email me it to me.  Thanks!

/tg

Re: Ginger Beer


Hi Simon

When I was very young (a long time ago in a Galaxy....etc.) we used to
make very nice ginger beer from a ginger beer plant.  I no longer have
the recipe but the following, found on the WWW, looks identical:-

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Equipment and Ingredients

Equipment
A jar and lid, which is big enough to contain the plant.
One pint-sized measuring jug
Several clean and dry two-litre plastic bottles.
Teaspoons
A large pan
A muslin cloth for straining the plant

Ingredients
Dried (powdered) ginger
Dried brewers yeast
Sugar
Juice of four lemons
Water

Making the Plant
The plant is a mixture of dried ginger, yeast, sugar and water. This
creates a yeast culture.

In the jar, place one teaspoon of dried yeast, two teaspoons of dried
ginger, four teaspoons of sugar and a (UK size) pint of cold water.

Stir and keep at room temperature.

Feed the plant every day with two teaspoons of dried ginger and four
teaspoons of sugar. Stir after feeding.

The plant will be ready after one week.

Making the Ginger Beer
Place 1kg (2lb) of sugar and two pints of boiling water in the large
pan. The sugar will dissolve.

Add the juice of the four lemons to the pan.

Strain the contents of the jar - the plant - through the cloth into
the pan. See below for what is to be done with the solid portion of
the plant.

Add 14 pints of room temperature water.

Stir and bottle. Fill the bottles about seven-eighths full as you need
to allow for expansion. Squeeze the air out of the bottles to stop
them exploding under pressure from their contents.

Store the bottles in a safe place at room temperature, and leave for
three to four weeks to 'brew'.

You can divide The "plant" sediment left on the muslin into two parts.
Put each part into a clean jar with a cupful of cold water. The plants
are then ready to be fed again. Give one to a friend.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
A few points:-

This is a UK recipe so pints mean UK sized pints; i.e. larger than US
pints.

I was probably pre-teenage when I used to make this (under parental
supervision) and as far as I am aware it is non-alcoholic (or very
low).  Certainly everybody regarded it as being fit for children to
drink - and they can do most of the work (certainly the daily feeding)
themselves.

I seem to remember the bottles having a tendency to explode - but that
could have been my own fault.  We also used to use glass bottles with
a screw top in those days.

As you can see from the recipe, you end up with lots of ginger beer
plus 2 more plants, so you could end up being inundated with the
stuff.

Regards

KGB

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Re: Ginger Beer


Mike wrote:
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Hi - new member of the group here
I've been playing around with both GB plants and recipes for brewing
with fresh ginger. I googled for the recipe, but can't find the original
URL - I can post the recipe if anyone's interested. I found using fresh
ginger (250 gms for a nominal gallon of water)with lager yeast produced
a much fresher taste than the ginger plant method. At the moment I'm
only doing gallon quantities and bottling in redundant plastic mineral
water bottles (easy to prevent explosions). however, it doesn't get much
chance to mature....Now I'm wondering whether to go to 5 gallon quantities.

Re: Ginger Beer


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quantities.

Sounds like you made need to go to 5 gal or brew like crazy @ 1 gal to build
up a buffer to give it time to mature a little. Once you do, you'll wonder
how to ever drank it green.

A little lemon juice in the recipie works well.

Mike



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