Mix Whisky with Water

I have sometimes mixed the 10 yo Talisker with a few drops of water... not more than 2-3 drops. I think the tallisker is a very strong whisky that explodes in the mouth, with pepper like taste and the water makes it much better.
The tallisker is btw exceptionel with dark chocolate :)) MMMMMMMM!!!!!!!
Mars
"Kay Pfeiffer" skrev i en meddelelse news:3f7a892c$0$266$ snipped-for-privacy@read.news.de.uu.net...
Reply to
Mars
I always add upto the same volume of filtered (or spring) water. The amount depends on the malt but can be as low as a quarter of the volume of malt.
--
Brett

I like to skate on the other side of the ice.
Reply to
Brett...
On Wed, 1 Oct 2003 20:56:04 -0400, the alleged Jimmy Smith, may have top-posted the following, to alt.drinks.scotch-whisky:
Cite?
Regards, Rob -- "Or better yet, use the Jack Daniels `shot and a chaser' glass. An honest admission of the true nature of Tennessee whiskey." -- Bushido in alt.drinks.scotch-whisky
Reply to
Robert Crowe
Jimmy,
So now I suppose you want to know which kind of cancer gives the better high.
> always........... drinking straight booze will give you cancer of the > tongue or throat. > > > > "Kay Pfeiffer" wrote in message > news:3f7a892c$0$266$ snipped-for-privacy@read.news.de.uu.net... > > Hi Folks > > > > at what time you mix whisky and water? > > What kind of water you take? > > > > cu > > Kay > > > >
Reply to
Mac Guffin

................ if you believe it is nonsense then you should just keep belting down the doubles buddy. suck em' up, sip em' slow and enjoy every last drop. you know, a lot of people still believe smoking doesn't not cause cancer. grow up
Reply to
Jimmy Smith
he's right that intake of alcohol generally is a risk factor, almost certainly wrong to imply diluting whisky cuts the risk much at all.
I drink whisky despite knowing this. I dilute only for taste.
I also eat butter, another risk factor, and I'm not planning on stopping:
cf
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"High alcohol consumption of more than 75 g per day increased the risk of esophageal cancer (odds ratio: 20.2, p
Reply to
Michael Bakunin

Michael, being from a math and science background, do you mind if I quote a bit more of that Japanese study that you are citing? Some on the group might like to know that the increased risk the study observed is for those patients who *already* had head and neck cancer... Johanna ---Original Text--- Alcohol consumption as a major risk factor in the development of early esophageal cancer in patients with head and neck cancer. Tanabe H, Yokota K, Shibata N, Satoh T, Watari J, Kohgo Y. Third Department of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical College. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the incidence of concomitant esophageal cancers in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), and to investigate which risk factors are responsible for this association. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1994 to 2000, 134 patients with HNC underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using the 0.8% Lugol stain method to detect esophageal cancer. A case-control study was designed to compare HNC patients with and without esophageal cancer. ---End of Text---  
certainly wrong to imply diluting whisky cuts the risk much at all. I drink whisky despite knowing this.  I dilute only for taste. I also eat butter, another risk factor, and I'm not planning on stopping: cf
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"High alcohol consumption of more than 75 g per day increased the risk of esophageal cancer (odds ratio: 20.2, p<0.01). Intake of hard liquor showed a high odds ratio (whisky: 28.7, p<0.05, shochu: 12.7, p<0.05)."
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"high consumption of butter..associated strongly and independently with an increase in oesophageal-cancer risk.."
Reply to
Johanna
diluting it doesn't reduce the amount of carcinogens.
at the risk of starting a flame up, it's immature replies such as yours that are indicative of someone who needs to grow up. buddy.
/\/\\/\/\/\//\/\
Reply to
dave mckinnon

In article , snipped-for-privacy@S-H-Sitzsysteme.de says...
Hello Kay,
Welcome to the conversation.
I almost never add water to malt whiskies bottled at 40%, 43%, or 46% alcohol by volume (ABV). I will add it only if the whisky seems harsh.
With cask strength or high proof whiskies I usually add a few drops of water, but I will taste the whisky first without adding anything.
Some whiskies are harsh even at 40% ABV, while some high proof whiskies are very good with no water added at all.
I will add a little at a time. I don't want to add too much. I want to drink the whisky at the highest ABV that doesn't burn my taste.
When I add water I prefer spring water or bottled water. But I have used tap water when I am in an area where the tap water tastes good.
Bart
Reply to
Bart

In article , snipped-for-privacy@name.com says...
Dark chocolate seems to go very well with whisky. It is a nice match for a very sherried whisky; what is surprising is that it also goes very well with the really peated whiskies like Talisker and the Islays.
But it seems that it must be dark chocolate. Milk chocolate is a much harder thing to match with whisky.
Scharffen Berger!!!
Bart
Reply to
Bart

In article , snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.bomb says...
Good post. I have to respect someone who can cite their sources.
But I think most people (and I include myself even though I know better) have a hard time remembering the difference between a statistical correlation and a causal (cause-and-effect) relationship. And while alcohol consumption may be a statistical risk factor for one malady, it may be at the same time a statistically advantageous one for another, like heart disease.
I think wisdom lies with the Greeks on this one: not avoidance, but "in all things, moderation". It's usually attributed to Aristotle but seems to be the general bent of Greek social thinking.
I chased down the link on alcohol consumption, and Johanna was right, I think, that it matters that the people studied already had cancers in adjacent tissues. But a known propensity (family history?) toward cancer would make a reasonable stand-in. And certainly all propensities are not known.
If there are carcinogens in whisky - and where aren't there? - then diluting would not decrease the amount of carcinogens ingested. But if it's a matter of irritation then it would concievably ameliorate that. Before the Islamic world yeilded the secret of distillation, anything stronger than strong wine was almost unknown. (Some ancients are reported to have frozen wine and skimmed off the liquid that didn't freeze - it was reported that this skimmed "wine" was very powerful and only a small amount was as effective as several cups of common wine. Those nutty barbarians!) So high proof spirits could be said to be "unnatural"; while at the same time they are a raw agricultural product - a good unfiltered "straight from the cask" whisky will often have all sorts of little splinters and debris floating about.
Perhaps abstinence would add some months, even years, to my life. The problem is that it adds them to the end of my life: who needs another few months of wasting away on a respirator? And it would definitely subtract something pleasant from my middle age. Now if it would give me a few more months of being 22,...
Bart
[citations snipped]
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As much as wine has played the infidel And robbed me of my robe of honor, well... I often wonder what the vintner buys One half so precious as the goods he sells?
------- Edward Fitzgerald's Adaptation of the Rubayat of Omar Khayyam
Reply to
Bart
Taking a moment's reflection, Johanna mused: | | Michael, being from a math and science background, do you mind if I quote | a bit more of that Japanese study that you are citing? Some on the group | might like to know that the increased risk the study observed is for | those patients who *already* had head and neck cancer... Johanna
Sounds a bit like the original study that showed that salt and eggs were bad for the heart ... only to realise this correlation was found because all of the tests subjects were diagnosed with heart disease prior to the study.
Reply to
mhicaoidh

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