pronunciation of the word "glenlivet"

greetings group, i am really quite new to scotch drinking, having only really began about two months ago. i purchased a pint each of J&B rare and the glenlivet 12 year old. the glenlivet is far better, but i have been drinking it rather slowly since it is damn expensive ($20 for a pint, tax included, where i live) , but quite tasty, none the less. i am curious, however, how is the word "glenlivet" supposed to be pronounced? is it supposed to be "glen-liv-it," as it is spelled, or is it more like "glen-liv-ay," which, on second thought, sounds more french than scottish. i must admit that when i first saw the word, i thought it was "glenvliet" and was thus far easier to pronounce...but when i went to their website, i had to type in the name, and thus noticed it was "glenlivet." anyway, i am ready and willing to be educated. thanks adam
Reply to
Adam Bailey
Hi Adam,
The following link will tell you how to pronounce most whisky names.
Why not try the most difficult one : laphroaig
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have fun
Martin
"Adam Bailey" schreef in bericht news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Reply to
Martin Finke
thanks much for the site. it is quite informative. now i wont feel like an idiot asking for all these oddly-named scotches from behind the counter.
addendum: bought 750ml of johnnie walker red tonight. its quite a nice little number, i must say. not quite as strong as the glenlivet...its quite pleasant with only one ice cube, as opposed to the two i usually put in my glenlivet, which, sadly, has about one dram left.
Reply to
Adam Bailey

You should try your whisky without ice (numbs the tastebuds). Try some neat, then with a little water added. I try to drink it at room temperature (about 66F here in London). The subtleties of flavour and aroma just aren't apparent (to me) when whisky is chilled.
regards
Esmond
Reply to
Esmond
whisky is chilled.
That's right. It's only better chilled if there are flavor elements you want to take OUT, while still preserving some basic flavors. That's why I like my Bowmore Legend on ice--it takes out this mealy, treacly tone it can have, and leaves only the cool, fresh peat blast. Much like slightly chilling Gamay (Beaujolais grape) takes out a bright, tacky candy quality, and leaves the more rich deep cherry and raspberry.
Chilling Johnnie Walker Red makes sense, because it smoothes out some of the rough spirit, and preserves the overall good flavor. I wouldn't chill Glenlivet, though, unless it had gotten skanky from sitting in the bottle forever.
Reply to
Douglas W. Hoyt
really, the only reason i chill my scotch is because i can't yet swallow it without wincing if i dont chill it. the burning is a bit too strong for me as of yet. but i think i may gradually ween myself off the ice.
i must say that one of my favorite effects of scotch drinking is the tingling sensation it leaves in my mouth after a glass or two. its quite nice. does this happen to most everyone? or just to us newbies?
Reply to
Adam Bailey
I've found that taking smaller sips and letting them linger in the mouth a moment works, too.
As a relative newbie myself, that was one of the first things I noticed about it, too.
--
Nick, Retired in the San Fernando Valley           www.boonchoo.com
"Giving violent criminals a government guarantee that their intended
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Reply to
n_cramer
mouth a moment works, too.
And don't forget saliva. It's a high-proof single-malt drinker's best friend. Sounds gross though.
Reply to
Douglas W. Hoyt
In article , snipped-for-privacy@charter.net says...
I almost entirely agree.
Except, that when it is very hot out, adding a small sliver of ice to a shot of whisky doesn't chill it too much but can make it very refreshing. Say, dropping it 35 degrees (F) when it's 100 F out. In such a case, it's more like adding a splash of water.
The other interesting case is chilling a whisky quite cold. And here you don't want to try it with anything too nice, but whisky takes on a very interesting texture after it's been chilled in the freezer below the freezing point of pure water. Try a white labeled Bushmills, regular Jameson's, or a Tullamore Dew. You're definitely losing some delicate nuances, but these don't have a lot of nuances to begin with. They become more viscous, which lends them an interesting mouthfeel. And held in the mouth they will eventually approach body temperature, which is really quite warm.
Bart
Reply to
Bart

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