How to verify someone's Sommellier Certification?


Hello,
How can you verify that someone really has a Second Level Somm certification?
Is there a list online of who has the cert? Or some place I can call? Perhaps an example of what a diploma looks like?
thanks
Reply to
Harley

"Harley" wrote ...........
What qualification from which educational authority?
The most widely recognized and prestigious wine titles in the world are Master Sommelier (MS) and Master of Wine (MW)
The Court of Master Sommeliers is based in London and has been educating and certifying sommeliers since 1977.
Wine/service experience is a requirement for the introductory course and a minimum of five years in the wine/service industry is required for the advanced course. The master diploma exam is by invitation only after successful completion of the introductory and advanced exams. There are currently 112 Master Sommeliers in the world.
The American Chapter can be found here
Court of Master Sommeliers American Chapter c/o: Balzac Communications Phone: (707) 255-7667 snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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The International Sommelier Guild is an Oregon based body which accredits through local schools.
They offer four levels from Wine Fundamentals 1 & 2, to a Sommelier Diploma program, thence to a Grand Sommelier Diploma program.
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In this day and age of fake qualifications (I myself am very proud of my peerage!!!!) it is very easy to check the validity of a claim.
--
st.helier - VW; GTO & Bar.
Reply to
st.helier

How does one get an invitation? Is it reasonable that anyone who has achieved the required prerequisites would have already come to the attention of the inviters?
What do they do?
Jose
--
There are more ways to skin a cat than there are cats.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
Reply to
Jose

If this person has this "second level somm certification" that certification must come from an organization. And the obviuos answer is: call that organization and ask a confirmation of this person's status as a sommelier.
--
  Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Reply to
Vilco

"Jose" in news:UToMg.17231$% snipped-for-privacy@newssvr29.news.prodigy.net :
They are somms, in that they specialize in the restaurant or service side of wine; masters of their trade, in that they've demonstrated objective ability, which includes the series of exams.
Two skilled, respected somms in my region passed for MS last year. Both are very quietly competent, in my experience, as well as passionate about wine. (One of them, a few years earlier, spotted a counterfeit esoteric Burgundy at a wine tasting -- later confirmed -- by a change in its usual lettering on the capsule. The other was asked by a friend of mine to summarize what capability is expected of MS licentiates. He answered, I'll paraphrase: enough detailed knowledge to permit parachuting into a restaurant most anywhere, and know whatever wines they'd have on hand and accurately advise customers about them.)
My (casual) impression from comments by several MSs and MWs -- I'm happy to be corrected -- is that the MS program includes emphasis on broad encyclopedic knowledge of wine regions and producers, in comparison to the blind sensory evaluation and winemaking elements that stand out in accounts of the (somewhat older and merchant-oriented) Master of Wine (MW) credential, though obviously all of these elements are relevant to both, and both are intended for professionals with experience and talent. (The MW candidates today also write a substantial thesis as part of the program.)
Even trainees for the MS can be impressive. One of them worked at a unique high-end bistro in my region (Village Pub, Woodside, California) a few years ago when a wine-merchant friend called for a spontaneous dinner there around two older, fairly obscure Spanish wines she'd acquired. She brought them to the restaurant and the young MS trainee on duty not only spoke knowledgeably and respectfully on the wines as soon as he saw them, but suggested thoughtful counterpoint wines from the restaurant's list, when we raised the question.
FWIW -- Max
PS -- Longtime North American wine fans may recall the in-depth article, in the US wine magazine "Vintage," on the MW (not MS) program in the late 1970s, detailing the stringent blind-tasting requirements in the practical exams, and their low pass rate. The subject was also discussed in the early days of the wine newsgroup (net.wines, 1980s).
Reply to
Max Hauser

I take it from this (and the rest of the post) that the MSs work in the restaurant business as somms, nothing special, and are just especially good at it. Those must be some lucky restaurants!
Jose
--
There are more ways to skin a cat than there are cats.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
Reply to
Jose

I doubt that luck has much to do with it. I'm quite sure that the MSs are well paid for their services and move elsewhere if their compensation doesn't meet expectations. It's no different from any worker who demonstrates unusual mastery of their subject.
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton

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