Old Pfalz Spatlese and food

Hello there - old contributor, and ever-present lurker here.
A bottle of 1997 Dr. Bürklin-Wolf Forster Kirchenstück Spatlese Trocken (why is everything such a mouthful in German?). I plan to serve it at a w ine dinner I'm hosting next month, which will include mostly reds.
I can find next to nothing about this wine. What do I expect? And the rea l reason for posting here after a long absence, what should I drink with it ? I've read that old Rieslings pair well with game, and I do have some fan tastic cow moose in the freezer, so it's an option. But does that pairing work with Pfalz wines as well?
Anyway, any advice that you all have will be highly appreciated.
Chris
Reply to
Chris Sprague
en (why is everything such a mouthful in German?). I plan to serve it at a wine dinner I'm hosting next month, which will include mostly reds.
eal reason for posting here after a long absence, what should I drink with it? I've read that old Rieslings pair well with game, and I do have some f antastic cow moose in the freezer, so it's an option. But does that pairin g work with Pfalz wines as well?
Never had this wine. And only 1997 Pfalz I remember was a sweeter Spatlese from Muller-Catoir. But Kirchenstuck is a very highly regarded vineyard, es pecially for dry (trocken) wines. Now this wine would be labelled a Grosses Gewachs. I'd think it could definitely stand up to game. Closest equivalen t I could think of would be top Alsace Rieslng, where I'd probably consider pork roast or choucroute.
Reply to
DaleW
Dry wine, good vineyard, good producer. It should be a nice wine. There is a tasting note from cellartracker saying that it was good but not great:
"this was a little disappointing , cause i was expecting more from the german Montrachet vineyard. mature and nice . Fresh and mineral. Gonna wait with my last one for the 20th anniversary" 92 points. Tasted in feb, 15.
I am not sure about game (quail? venison?). If i was in your shoes, I would have a plate of cheeses in case your game is too strong for the wine.
Reply to
santiago
Thank you for your responses. I think I may be leaning towards serving thi s with the cheese course, between the main course and dessert. I'll try to avoid anything too strong here, I suppose. If I have any blues I'll save them for the Port - 1965 Barros Colheita.
I did manage to find a merchant in Germany selling several vintages of this wine, not that I'm considering buying more, much less from Germany, but th e merchant did mention some food pairings, many of them Asian (unsurprising ly):
Vorspeisen: Wildpastete Vorspeisen: Reisgerichte Nasi Goreng Fischgerichte: Lachs gegrillt /gebraten Fischgerichte: Aal grün Fischgerichte: Karpfen gebacken Fischgerichte: Fischcurry Geflügelgerichte: Fasan auf Sauerkraut Fleischgerichte: Schweinefleisch Saumagen Schinken, Würste, Kassler Fleischgerichte: Schweinefleisch Schinken im Brotteig Schinken, Würste, K assler
Roughly translated, these are: Starters: Wild pie Starters: Rice dishes Nasi Goreng Fish dishes: Salmon grilled / fried Fish dishes: eel green Fish dishes: baked carp Fish dishes: fish curry Chicken: pheasant on sauerkraut Meat dishes: pork pig's stomach hams, sausages, Kassler Meat dishes: pork ham in bread ham, sausages, Kassler
I do make a nice glazed salmon, with a soy and mirin glaze, and a friend wh o is home for Christmas just gifted me a side of wild Alaskan Salmon. So t hat's tempting.
Anyway, thanks for your suggestions! Chris
Reply to
Chris Sprague
Chris Sprague wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:
That could work beautifully with an aged Grosses G?wachs as is your case here. Please uncork the wine a few hours before the dinner and have a taste to see if it is closed and in need for aireation.
Reply to
santiago

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