[TN] Corton Charlemange R&R JAcob 1992


Hello, This wine was obtained at the iDealWine auction site this summer. AFAICR, the price was c EU 30. The producer is situated in Ladoix-Serrigny and describes themselves as recoltant-viticulteur. The cork was in excellent shape, and ullage minimal. [c] Definitely ambre. [n] Very typical mature Chardonnay nose with nuts, overripe apples, and the smell of forest undergrowth in mid-autumn. [p] Laid-back acidic attack, a bit toast, more apples and nuts, and a dry finish leaning towards artichokes. Length could have been better. Oxidative notes.
Overall impression: I served this with a cajun-influenced okra cassoulet and seared halibut. Since the spicyness was kept down a bit, the pairing worked very well. The wine may have passed its apex, and I don't think it a good idea to keep it - no bother as this was my only bottle. That said, I do not regret shelling out EU 30 for it, and my life is better for having tasted it.
Cheers
Nils Gustaf
-- Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se
--
Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se
Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
> The wine may have passed its apex, and I don't think it a good idea to keep > it - no bother as this was my only bottle. That said, I do not regret > shelling out EU 30 for it, and my life is better for having tasted it.
The Corton-Charlemagne you tasted seems to have aged a bit faster than a few of the best examples. However you can not argue with the price. It is not unusual for a CC to cost US $50 to over $100 in retail stores in the US, and one euro is now worth a bit more than one US dollar.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz
"cwdjrxyz" skrev i meddelandet news:1159118583.721764.96950@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com... > > The Corton-Charlemagne you tasted seems to have aged a bit faster than > a few of the best examples. That is my impression too. I drank a Corton-Charlemange 1982 in 2001, and it was considerably younger in taste and appearance (clear straw-yellow as I recall, wonderful). That is the obvious problem with buying on an auction - provenance is uncertain. > However you can not argue with the price. > It is not unusual for a CC to cost US $50 to over $100 in retail stores > in the US, and one euro is now worth a bit more than one US dollar.
Of course, it is always a question what you are willing to pay. E g, would you pay EU 700 for a Petrus 1975? Would you pay it if you knew the ullage was at half-shoulder? This bottle we had I would not have valued at USD 100 - EU 30 is about right ... that would correspond to USD 38-39 ...
Cheers Nils Gustaf
-- Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se
--
Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se
Reply to
Nils Gustaf Lindgren

Site Timeline Threads

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.