"TN": Meaning Of ?


Hello,
Okay, I'll show my ignorance:
What does "TN" mean in these posts, please ?
Any other acronyms like this I should know ?
Thanks, B.
Reply to
Robert11

That's funny. I had long wondered the same thing, and never read any posts that began with TN, since I thought it was about wine from Tennessee. I had no interest in wine from Tennessee, in fact I didn't know that they made wine in TN.
Mike Hagley
Reply to
Mike Hagley

In fact there are now quite a few TN wines. See
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for likely more than you ever wished to know about TN wines. Quite a few wines were made in TN in the 1800s. Then for a long time after repeal of prohibition, TN wines were not very common and especially were not well known out of state. More recently several wineries are making what some consider fairly decent wine, although I have never tasted any TN wine. In fact most US states now produce some wine that is at least fairly drinkable. I have not yet heard of grape wine from Alaska, but then I have not searched for it. I suppose you could grow wine grapes in greenhouses there with the addition of extra grow lights and heat, although the wine would thus be very expensive and likely mainly a matter of state pride.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

In fact most US states now produce some wine that
I found there are a very few wineries in Alaska. Most make fruit wine and a bit of grape wine also is made from juice from California and Canada (it likely is too far to ship ripe grapes). I did not find any wines claiming to be made from grapes grown in Alaska. I found an icewine and something I have not been looking for - a sparkling rhubarb wine!
There is a bit of grape wine made in Hawaii from Hawaiian grown grapes. The climate of most of Hawaii likely is not well suited to the more popular wine grapes. However there is much fruit wine made. How would you like some guava wine? At least one Hawaiian winery will ship to some US states.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

cwdjrxyz wrote on Thu, 12 Feb 2009 13:11:20 -0800 (PST):
I've had pineapple wine in Maui and it's not great but it's drinkable . The same winery (I'd have to look up the name) also uses real grapes and the same tasting comments apply.
Reply to
James Silverton

This is one of the rare fruits other than grapes that have lots of tartaric acid. On the surface it seems to me that pineapple would be a good candidate for winemaking... Maybe it's a matter of finding the right terroir, reducing yields, experimenting with harvest time...
Reply to
Mike Tommasi

Just imagine the future possibilities, people will be talking about pineapple varieties and vintages, terroirs. A 1998 Kona Sugarloaf with searing acidity, a 2001 Pernambuco "vendange tardive" with fine aromas of... yes, pineapple... plus a 2005 Reunion AOC Victoria Gourmet. With enough global warming we could even grow these in Languedoic someday... :-)
Reply to
Mike Tommasi

You might be thinking of
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which offers both pineapple wine and sparkling pineapple wine, among others. They will ship to some US states and have wines available in the US, Canada, and Switzerland at locations listed on the site.
Also see
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. They make some wines from a grape variety, developed at the University of California, that will grow well in their climate. They also have some rather exotic fruit and honey wines. They will ship to some states on the mainland, but they do not appear to distribute their wine to stores other than in Hawaii.
Besides some grape wine, Mexico also makes a "wine" called pulque from a species of agave. Much of this is low grade, cloudy, and is apt to give one the "tourist trots", although it should be quite possible to make premium grades. It could be that the agave used has a mucilage- like substance as do some cactus plants. Although some cactus is good cooked, often it should be cooked with several changes of water to get rid of the mucilage-like substance to avoid the "tourist trots". Perhaps one could make some chili pepper wine by adding chili peppers to the fermenting pulque. Even a sparkling version might be possible. This might match some SW US foods. The Russians make a pepper vodka, so why not a pepper pulque? :-) . If global warming is more severe than expected, perhaps growing classic wine grapes in the Languedoic and elsewhere in France will become impossible, and pulque will replace wine as the national drink of France :-) .
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

cwdjrxyz wrote on Sat, 14 Feb 2009 13:40:51 -0800 (PST):
And why not? But I've had pepper vodka from Russia and like it for Russian style "down the hatch" drinking if it has been kept in the freezer. I've also tried Absolut "Peppar Vodka", which is a big disappointment since it seems to be made with sweet green peppers. Making your own pepper vodka is fairly simple.
Reply to
James Silverton

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