Rhubarb wine question

I've been reading the posts on Rhubarb wine... my question is a simple one - how does it taste? Do you feel it's worth making?
Thanks, Julie
Reply to
Julie
Yes Julie, I feel it is worth making. I make 25l ~6.6 gallons and use a 1/2 litre (Brew King) or can (Alexanders) of white grape concentrate with the wine. It definitely adds body and character to the wine. Most people who drink it say it doesn't taste like rhubarb. I dont know if that is good or bad. I think it is very nice wine. I have made it dry but now add sugar after stopping anywhere from 1/2 to 4 percent. The better the fruit quality the less sugar that is required to make it a palatable wine. At least from my experience. I thought it was good enough to start growing rhubarb myself.
Dar who post here makes country wines, maybe she will weigh in.
Lee
Reply to
LEE WEISS
Julie, I guess I'll weigh in. I've made pure Rhubarb wine twice using Jack's recipe, and I'll make it again this summer. I've been using rhubarb this past year or so, as a body builder for some of my wines, because it yields to the taste of the other fruit. Lee is right, in that it does not taste like rhubarb. It's hard to describe what it tastes like...different, but nice. I agree also, that rhubarb is a better wine when sweetened a bit. If you want to try it, I would start with a 1 gallon recipe, and find someone who has too much rhubarb and would be willing to give you some before you plant some (like me who has too much). Planting some won't give you rhubarb the first year, you need to wait a whole year, better if you can wait 2 years, before picking. Find a recipe on Jack Keller's wine site, and pick one that matches your taste. I would suggest you freeze the rhubarb for a month and thaw before making the wine. Freezing breaks down the rhubarb much better than trying it fresh. If you like the taste of lemons for the acid requirement, use them; but if you don't, try oranges (I thought oranges were better). Please don't forget to use the precipitated chalk to remove the oxalic acid from the rhubarb. And if you want to, add a container of Welch's 100% white grape juice for additional body. Like any wine you make from fruit, flowers, or vegetables, only you will know whether it is worth it or not to continue making it. Also, it might take you a couple of batches to get the wine to match your taste. Good-luck. Darlene
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Reply to
Dar V
I do feel it's worth making. Though if you don't like rhubarb, it's doubtful as to whether you will like pure (unblended) rhubarb wine.
How I usually make mine is detailed here:
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Though I've more recently been experimenting with lees stirring:
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General info on Rhubarb wine can be found at:
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HTH, Ben
Reply to
Ben Rotter
I visited Walkers Fruit Basket last year and got to try wine made from most of their juices. The dry Rhubarb was OK in my opinion but my wife really liked it. Hence I have 6 gal going now. It does make a very acidic wine. Good luck. Is type of wine worth making? That depends on your own personal taste.
Ray
Reply to
Ray
Not in my experience. Obviously it depends on how much rhubarb you use (and the maturity/quality), but I've made Rhubarb wine with almost 4 lb/US gal. (437 g/l) - i.e. quite a bit of rhubarb - and still only ended up with a TA of 8.1 g/l. It's not uncommon to see recipes which involve acidification (even without deacidification of oxalic) - see
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for example, which also uses an unusually high amount of rhubarb.
Very true and well said. Beyond taste I'd say that it is worth making based on the fact that it works well as a blender, is malleable in style, is highly individual, and is quite ageable.
Ben
Reply to
Ben Rotter
On 2/11/04 7:13 PM, in article
I agree - I only deacidified my first ever rhubarb batch according to Jack's directions. I found it lacking in acid and added some later. Now I don¹t bother trying to remove oxalic acid as I just don't find it a problem.
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Greg Cook
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Reply to
Greg Cook
I made a 5 gal batch last year with about 4 lbs. per gal. I bottled it when it was finished, and later when I opened a bottle, I found it wasn't quite finished. I now have a very delightful tasting sparkling wine with a nice, slightly sour after taste that is the rhubarb style. I am very happy with it though I'll probably never get it to sparkle up again in the upcoming years like this batch
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Roger and Lynda
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Reply to
Roger
I feel it is unfortunate that the ingredient doesn't have a more elegant name. Our favorite method is to use equal pounds sugar and chopped up rhubarb. Let the sugar extract the juices, strain. Using Wincalc adjust to your favorite starting S.G.. After a bit we've had a delightful wine that is nowhere near the sound of its name.
Dick
Reply to
Richard Kruse
And just what is wrong with the name Rhubarb? I live in the deep south where rhubarb is not grown and have always considered it a delightfully exotic name. I have 5 gal going now made from rhubarb juice from Walkers Fruit Basket.
Ray
to
Reply to
Ray
On 2/19/04 9:57 AM, in article m15Zb.996$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr22.news.prodigy.com,
I think the Amana colonies in Iowa use a German slang word for their rhubarb wine. They call it "Piestengel". I'm tempted to use that on my next label.
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Greg Cook
http://homepage.mac.com/gregcook/Wine
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Greg Cook

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