rhubarb wine......

Hi.....I've started rhubarb wine for the first time in 20 years......using this for a recipe.....
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...it advises taking out all the oxalic acid ....which is fine....then putting in juice of 2 lemons as the acid.....what is the benefit of citric acid in the form of lemon juice over adding "acid blend" usually used in other country wines?....also i'd like to tweak a little by adding some golden raisins.....would 1/2lb(250grams) be an ok thing?....andy j.
Reply to
Andy j.
Do you have any other recipes which you can compare? Stephen SG
| Hi.....I've started rhubarb wine for the first time in 20 | years......using this for a recipe..... |
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...it advises taking | out all the oxalic acid ....which is fine....then putting in juice of | 2 lemons as the acid.....what is the benefit of citric acid in the | form of lemon juice over adding "acid blend" usually used in other | country wines?....also i'd like to tweak a little by adding some | golden raisins.....would 1/2lb(250grams) be an ok thing?....andy j.
Reply to
Stephen SG
Actually, depending on the amount of rhubarb used there probably won't be much oxalic acid in the wine. I would argue that deacidifying rhubarb must destroys the unique acid profile of rhubarb wine (for more, see under "Rhubarb" at
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.
Simply flavour profile really. Using a blend of acids is fine.
For 1 US gallon? Sure.
Ben
Reply to
Ben Rotter
Hi, Instead of using lemons, I use oranges for the acid requirement in rhubarb wine. I noticed a hint of lemon in my rhubarb wine the first time I made it, which I wasn't crazy about, and it did not lesson over time. The second time I made it I used oranges, and I was very happy with it. You can use acid blend instead, it is up to you. I do use precipitated chalk with rhubarb wine - for me there is a difference if you use or don't use it. Raisins would be a good addition to rhubarb. I freeze my rhubarb before I make wine from it, it seems to help break down the stalks. I've also added 1 can of frozen 100% white grape juice to the recipe(but lesson the sugar you add if you do this). That's the neat think about making your own wine, you can change the recipe to match what you like. Good-luck. Darlene
Reply to
Dar V
Not having made this wine and viewing Jackkellers recipe I see your plight, any how. I hope this explains what you want to know. The problems arise from two causes. Firstly, rhubarb contains a poisonous acid called "oxalic" and secondly, for reasons partly unknown, it sometimes causes destruction of the yeast which floats around in clumps in the wine in a most disgusting fashion. The two problems are resolved by first treating the rhubarb in a different fashion from that advocated in old country wine-making books, and, secondly, by ensuring the conditions are ideal for the yeast. Now, the main acid in rhubarb is malic acid, a good fermenting acid and valuable in maturing. It is present in almost every cell of the plant. The poisonous acid "oxalic acid" is in little lumps called nodules which are scattered here and there in the plant. If the juice is extracted with boiling water as was the normal way, then the oxalic acid is dissolved into the liquor along with the flavour and the helpful malic acid. At this point chalk was added to get rid of the acids and then citric acid was added to allow fermentation to proceed.This was a very hit-and-miss method which frequently allowed fermentations to proceed without sufficient acid. The result was an evil smelling concoction. On the other hand people quite often eat large amounts of stewed rhubarb without ill results. Stephen SG
| Hi.....I've started rhubarb wine for the first time in 20 | years......using this for a recipe..... |
formatting link
...it advises taking | out all the oxalic acid ....which is fine....then putting in juice of | 2 lemons as the acid.....what is the benefit of citric acid in the | form of lemon juice over adding "acid blend" usually used in other | country wines?....also i'd like to tweak a little by adding some | golden raisins.....would 1/2lb(250grams) be an ok thing?....andy j.
Reply to
Stephen SG
Hi all,
rhubarb-wine is a traditional in Holland; needing normally about 5 - 7 years of maturation, in which time the oxalic acid is broken down (oxalic acid, being the weakest of the present acids, is the first that breeaks down). Oxalic acid makes the wine, just as peach-wine, unsuited for diabetics. There are a few methods to speed things up. First is to remove most of the oxalic acid; using chalk and correcting the acids to the preferred level; second, and new is adding a handful of elderflowers after first racking. You will be surprised by the effect of the latter! The wine will be well drinkable after a year and will greatly benefit by moderate aging. The oxalic acid normally gives the wine its rhubarb smell, and that is removed by the elderflowers. This method does not solve the problem that the wine is not suited for diabetics.
Ed from Holland.
"Stephen SG"
Reply to
ed montforts
So why is Oxalic acid unsuited for diabetics. As type 2 diabetic of some 2 years standing now I have never heard this one and would like some further information -- or a direction in which to research it myself TIA
Reply to
Pinky
On 6/3/04 4:21 AM, in article
I would agree with the acid. I used Jack's suggested deacidification on my first batch, but never again. The wines have turned out well. I would also add that I find more distinctly clean rhubarb flavor in my wines when I don't ferment on the pulp. My preferred method now is to freeze the rhubarb, then thaw. I add some water depending on my desired dilution along with some sulfite. Let this steep for 2-3 days, then press it out. Add sugar and ferment. It seems to reduce the vegetative notes that can accompany rhubarb.
Reply to
Greg Cook

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