Bottled Beer: Overcarbonated

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After successfully making beer for my wife for years (bottled) I suddenly
have an overcarbonated batch, taking off the cap results in most of the beer
spewing out the top.

My solution so far is to try this:  I make my beer using Tap-a-draft 6litre
bottles, so I poured her beer including foam into one of my 6 liters, let it
settle and added a teaspoon of suger and refrigerated. (much like I do my
own).  Hopefully in a week or two it will be recarbonated.

Now I just did this with one 6litre as a test.  Do any of you have any other
ideas or could tell me likely what happened to cause the overcabonation?
Thanks!

RT




Re: Bottled Beer: Overcarbonated



Your beer was not finished fermenting before you primed and bottled.


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BierNewbie
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Re: Bottled Beer: Overcarbonated



BierNewbie;11862 Wrote:
> Your beer was not finished fermenting before you
primed and bottled.

That would be my guess as well.


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hevimees

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Re: Bottled Beer: Overcarbonated


The amount of carbonation is related to the temperature of the beer
when you bottle it.  For example, if you use 1/2 tsp of corn sugar to
bottle a beer at 70 F, you would get a different level of carbonation
if you bottled the same beer at 65 F.  The colder the beer the more it
can hold CO2.


Troy





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Re: Bottled Beer: Overcarbonated


If you used the normal amount of priming sugar, and fermentation had
finished (you took a SG measure before bottling right?) then it could be
wild yeast. How does it taste ? Wild yeast, or wine yeasts even can
ferment a lot more of the sugars in the beer often to near 100%
attenuation, which beer yeast can not do. It'll taste pretty bad if that
is the case though.


JB wrote:
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