Pub Grub

It confirms what I have believed recently.
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It doesn't cost much more to eat in a proper restaurant these days and probably represents better value for money.
Pubs are pretending to be restaurants these days, which they are not.
Reply to
Saxman

# It doesn't cost much more to eat in a proper restaurant these days and # probably represents better value for money.
# Pubs are pretending to be restaurants these days, which they are not.
I think there broad range of quality in both pubs and restaurants. If you can find a pub that sells decent beer and decent food, you are onto a winner and you don't have to pay crazy prices for drink on the whole.
I really do get fed up with restaurants charging 15 quid for a bottle of wine that cost them a fiver from Tesco!
Both however have an alarming habit of presenting you withfood that looks good but tastes rubbish.
Contrast with Portugal, where you have to try pretty hard to get a bad meal, unless you go into the most touristy of bars/restaurants,
Reply to
Bill Hewitt
>It confirms what I have believed recently. > >
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> >It doesn't cost much more to eat in a proper restaurant these days and >probably represents better value for money. > >Pubs are pretending to be restaurants these days, which they are not.
I notice the findings are from the Good Pub Guide which is much more 'foody' than CAMRA's GBG. A bet a survey from that latter publication would tell a different story. It's still possible to get a main course and a pint at Wetherspoons for under £6. Whilst portion controlled prepacked stuff isn't everyone's cup of tea, it fills a gap. And it's successful - 10 years ago food accounted for 17% of Wetherspoons sales, whereas now it's 30%. But even home made pub food needn't be dear. If you need proof, go to Dewsbury's West Riding Licenced Refreshment Rooms.
Reply to
M Platting
> I notice the findings are from the Good Pub Guide which is much more > 'foody' than CAMRA's GBG. A bet a survey from that latter publication > would tell a different story. > It's still possible to get a main course and a pint at Wetherspoons > for under £6. Whilst portion controlled prepacked stuff isn't > everyone's cup of tea, it fills a gap. And it's successful - 10 years > ago food accounted for 17% of Wetherspoons sales, whereas now it's > 30%. > But even home made pub food needn't be dear. If you need proof, go to > Dewsbury's West Riding Licenced Refreshment Rooms.
Wetherspoons probably represent what pub-grub should be about in terms of price. The food is not too bad for what one pays, although the food has not always been 'hot' in my local branch. I made a complaint about the food not being hot recently, and their excuse was that they had just got some new staff. Wetherspoons are always employing new staff at my local branch!
I did have an early morning breakfast (seven items) with coffee there recently for £2.00 with a qualifying voucher. Can't grumble about that.
The very same day I saw soup in a Suffolk pub for £3.95! I know they have got their overheads and a profit has to be made, but I can get a tin of soup in Aldi for £0.25!
Compare this to a very posh local hotel/restaurant where I can get a 3 course meal (moderate portions), with live entertainment, nice clean napkins, trained staff etc. with coffee for little over £20.00. Mind you, a bottle of wine is £20.00 there, so I drink the real ale instead. I can also dress-up and soak up the atmosphere, (hence my earlier comments about pubs pretending to be restaurants).
I agree with your comments about wine being exceedingly expensive in nearly all establishments. It's actually come down in price in recent years, as if one needs to be told. It's not uncommon on the Continent for customers to buy a bottle of wine in an establishment and share it around the table. I wonder why they don't do it here?
I also visited a popular riverside local recently. They have a very good turnover of customers and meals, but the carpet was threadbare and there were fruit machines adjacent to the dining tables. Altogether a bit run-down. I would rather pay a bit extra and go 'upmarket'.
Reply to
Saxman
>But even home made pub food needn't be dear. If you need proof, go to >Dewsbury's West Riding Licenced Refreshment Rooms. >
But take care with the timing.
The West Riding serves lunches, Mondays to Fridays only; pie and peas on Tuesday evenings, curries on Wednesday evenings, steaks (with table service) on Thursday evenings (new), "ale day" breakfasts on Saturdays, and sausage butties on Saturdays and Sundays until, IIRC, 9 p.m.
All the food is good, but it's the weekday lunches which are the highlight.
-- Regards
Mike
mikedotroebuckatgmxdotnet
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Regards

Mike
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Reply to
Mike Roebuck
Saxman (Saxman ) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying: > The very same day I saw soup in a Suffolk pub for £3.95! I know they > have got their overheads and a profit has to be made, but I can get a > tin of soup in Aldi for £0.25! Hmmm. I would imagine that there's a bit of a difference in quality there... £4 for a large bowl of fresh soup, made by the chef's own fair hands with top quality ingredients, served with a big hunk of fresh-from- the-oven crusty bread is cheap. Hell, my mouth's watering at the thought of it. That 25p tin of Aldi processed water seems to counter that quite effectively. I've had pub food ranging from the absolutely exquisite to a vaguely warm microwaved frozen yorkshire pudding with a tin of "Big Soup" ( No, that was SWMBO's. Mine had a tin of beans'n'sausages) tipped into it. You just _can't_ say "pub food" as a generic, just as "restaurant" covers a wide range of quality and prices. Is the "gastropub" taking over at the expense of the cling-filmed cheese and pickle roll? Yes, definitely (but not exclusively). Is that a good thing? Well, it must be economically good for the landlords. Else they wouldn't be doing it, would they...? > Compare this to a very posh local hotel/restaurant where I can get a 3 > course meal (moderate portions), with live entertainment, nice clean > napkins, trained staff etc. with coffee for little over £20.00. Can't be THAT posh. I've seen starters _alone_ for twenty quid before... > It's not uncommon on the Continent for customers to buy a bottle of > wine in an establishment and share it around the table. I wonder why > they don't do it here?
Quite a few places do. In fact, I reckon I've come across more here than abroad which do. Especially thinking of France.
Reply to
Adrian
> > It's not uncommon on the Continent > for customers to buy a bottle of wine in an establishment and share it > around the table. I wonder why they don't do it here?
Umm, isn't that normal in this country too?
-- "If a river bridge were not guarded by a parapet, the slackness of the defaulting authority deserves the blame, not the people who fall in" - Lieut. Col. Mervyn O'Gorman.
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"If a river bridge were not guarded by a parapet, the slackness of the
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Reply to
PeterE
> Hmmm. I would imagine that there's a bit of a difference in quality > there... £4 for a large bowl of fresh soup, made by the chef's own fair > hands with top quality ingredients, served with a big hunk of fresh-from- > the-oven crusty bread is cheap. Hell, my mouth's watering at the thought > of it. That 25p tin of Aldi processed water seems to counter that quite > effectively. I don't think that pub has a chef. >> Compare this to a very posh local hotel/restaurant where I can get a 3 >> course meal (moderate portions), with live entertainment, nice clean >> napkins, trained staff etc. with coffee for little over £20.00. > Can't be THAT posh. I've seen starters _alone_ for twenty quid before...
Looks like it to me.
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>> It's not uncommon on the Continent for customers to buy a bottle of >> wine in an establishment and share it around the table. I wonder why >> they don't do it here? > > Quite a few places do. In fact, I reckon I've come across more here than > abroad which do. Especially thinking of France.
I think it's the exception where I live.
Reply to
Saxman
> > >> But even home made pub food needn't be dear. If you need proof, go to >> Dewsbury's West Riding Licenced Refreshment Rooms. >> > > But take care with the timing. > > The West Riding serves lunches, Mondays to Fridays only; pie and peas > on Tuesday evenings, curries on Wednesday evenings, steaks (with table > service) on Thursday evenings (new), "ale day" breakfasts on > Saturdays, and sausage butties on Saturdays and Sundays until, IIRC, 9 > p.m. > > All the food is good, but it's the weekday lunches which are the > highlight.
Now that is what pub food should be about IMO. A local pub around here does a mussel and wine night. Pubs can play a good role in this aspect.
Reply to
Saxman
Saxman (Saxman ) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying: >> Hmmm. I would imagine that there's a bit of a difference in quality >> there... £4 for a large bowl of fresh soup, made by the chef's own fair >> hands with top quality ingredients, served with a big hunk of >> fresh-from- the-oven crusty bread is cheap. Hell, my mouth's watering >> at the thought of it. That 25p tin of Aldi processed water seems to >> counter that quite effectively. > I don't think that pub has a chef. I think you may be missing my point. >>> Compare this to a very posh local hotel/restaurant where I can get a 3 >>> course meal (moderate portions), with live entertainment, nice clean >>> napkins, trained staff etc. with coffee for little over £20.00. >> Can't be THAT posh. I've seen starters _alone_ for twenty quid >> before... > Looks like it to me. "Very posh" doesn't necessarily mean "clean napkins" to most people... >
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Order food "at the bar or use the notepad to write your own and give it to one of the waiting staff"? FFS! What are they "trained" in?
Reply to
Adrian
> Order food "at the bar or use the notepad to write your own and give it > to one of the waiting staff"? FFS! What are they "trained" in?
Is that such a hardship?
They do serve it to you, with tablecloths, decent tableware, etc.....
Milsoms restaurants have won quite a few awards.
You can view the menus online.
I have no connection with the company.
I should go to the pub instead with damp dogs, juke boxes, fruit machines and save a fiver.
Reply to
Saxman
> Saxman (Saxman ) gurgled > happily, sounding much like they were saying: > > >> Hmmm. I would imagine that there's a bit of a difference in quality > >> there... =A34 for a large bowl of fresh soup, made by the chef's own f= air > >> hands with top quality ingredients, served with a big hunk of > >> fresh-from- the-oven crusty bread is cheap. Hell, my mouth's watering > >> at the thought of it. That 25p tin of Aldi processed water seems to > >> counter that quite effectively. > > I don't think that pub has a chef. > > I think you may be missing my point. > > >>> Compare this to a very posh local hotel/restaurant where I can get a 3 > >>> course meal (moderate portions), with live entertainment, nice clean > >>> napkins, trained staff etc. with coffee for little over =A320.00. > >> Can't be THAT posh. I've seen starters _alone_ for twenty quid > >> before... > > Looks like it to me. > > "Very posh" doesn't necessarily mean "clean napkins" to most people... > > >
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> > Order food "at the bar or use the notepad to write your own and give it > to one of the waiting staff"? FFS! What are they "trained" in?
that does seem a bit odd . . . & the 'drink' choice is split into red & white (& that doesn't mean Irish Red, or Rodenbach & WitBier & Weisse) MikeMcG
Reply to
MikeMcG
> >I should go to the pub instead with damp dogs, juke boxes, fruit >machines and save a fiver.
Take away the juke boxes, fruit machine, and yes, give me the Three Stags' Heads at Wardlow Mires anyday!
Reply to
M Platting

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