Burlwood Cellars


ALDI Stores USA is now stocking Burlwood Cellars wines. These are produced buy E&J Gallo for the Hotel and Restaurant industry.
I've not tried them yet, but ALDI has five varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, White Zinfandel, Sauvignon Blanc, and Chardonnay, all at $5.99 per bottle. I picked up a bottle of 2003 Merlot and 2003 Sauvignon Blanc to review for the web site, and was curious if anyone has ever tried these before?
Thanks,
Mike
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mike@webwinerack.com
http://www.webwinerack.com - Wine, Wine Reviews, and Wine Information
Reply to
MikeD

I first had a glass of the Burlwood Merlot several years ago at a local German restaurant, and liked it quite a bit. When Aldi's opened nearby last year, I bought some and was less impressed (I'm not saying the wine wasn't necessarily as good, maybe my preference just changed in the interim). For an inexpensive Merlot, I currently really like the ForestVille, which was recommended by someone else in this newsgroup.
-- Steve Hehr
To send me email, replace the "OUT" in my address with its opposite.
Reply to
Steve Hehr

I never cared for Burlwood. When I lived in the Caribbean, we sold it as a catering wine option. I believe it was created to be sold as such( also house wine). Because it was produced specifically for the Hotel and Restaurant Industry there was no way for the consumer to gauge a price for the wine, as it was not available retail.
I believe we purchased for $3.99 and sold for $25 as our least expensive catering option.
Reply to
sisyphus

sisyphus wrote in news:io9j411qidi25dub953q snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
the Caribbean, we sold it
Sisyphus is being kind. Burlwood was the house wine a friend's club, It was in a word Burlywood with little grape.
Reply to
jcoulter

There were other options. As I said it was the least expensive option. The other offerings were, shall we say, better bargains. Like everything in life, the least expensive choice is usually not the best.
Reply to
sisyphus

You hit the nail on the head. One of the primary reasons for starting my wine reviews "at the bottom" is because MANY of these wines are out there with no reviews or information for the consumer. Google for Burlwood Cellars and you'll find a list of restaurants selling these wines for $20+/bottle to customers who most likely have no idea. I paid $5.99 a bottle. Yes, I know restaurants take a high markup on wine, but 400%? If consumers knew better that wouldn't be the case IMHO.
--
mike@webwinerack.com
http://www.webwinerack.com - Wine, Wine Reviews, and Wine Information
Reply to
MikeD

I noticed a local restaurant where I frequent selling Yellowtail Shiraz for something like $6 a glass/$15 a bottle. Earlier that very day I had just happened to notice the same exact wine at a local store for $3.30 a bottle. They probably paid less than $3 a bottle and are charging twice that for a glass. I had never really thought about the markup until I saw that. It wasn't really a 'wine' type restaurant, but still...markup is insane.
Reply to
potatoman

You may think of it as insane, but it is similar to the markup on the food that you eat at that same restaurant. Remember, food, wine, liquor...by purchasing those at the restaurant, you are paying for labor, lease, electricity, taxes, cleaning supplies, water, glasses, plates, flatware, the furniture, linens, possibly landscaping, payroll services, insurance, etc, etc. There is a lot of overhead involved.
You are paying for someone to cook for you and clean up after you. You frequent that restaurant beacuse you enjoy the job they do for you. The owners are probably not getting rich, but make a decent living. The servers, however, always need your help. Please tip generously! :)
P.S. $3.30 is a very good price for that particular wine. I belive it retails for $6-8 in most states.
Reply to
sisyphus

Oh, I understand the business side of a restaurant and markup. I wasn't saying it wasn't neccessary, just that it is remarkable when you actually stop and consider how much it can sometimes be. Although, I do think that 5 times the ammount of a bottle (which isn't the same as the markup on the cost of components of a meal which has to be prepared) is just a tad excessive. IMO, 100% markup is more than fair.
And, as a former server, I understand gratuity all too well. It's almost a curse - Sometimes when I think the server has done a dreadful job, I still leave more than what most would consider a decent tip, when I really shouldn't.
yeah, I know. That's what made me take note. It was just a coincidence that I saw it at the restaurant that night.
Reply to
potatoman

I agree with your assessment, but few restauranteurs would (though there are some). Shameful that it is tough to find the bargains on the less expensive end of the wine list, generally speaking.
I am a fomer sever as well, and do the same...15% for bad service.
Reply to
sisyphus

Right on the money, folks. I uncorked the Burlwood Cellars Sauvignon Blanc this evening. Even for $5.99 I was disappointed.
Here's the review, for anyone interested:
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I'm still going to review the other Burlwood wines, but so far I agree with the sentiments shared here.
Thanks,
Mike
--
mike@webwinerack.com
http://www.webwinerack.com - Wine, Wine Reviews, and Wine Information
Reply to
MikeD

The only way a server gets less than 15% from me is if they are RUDE. If RUDE---5%. Otherwise its 15-22% at a nice restaurant...for cheap eats it can be much more. Like Chinese Lunch Special of 6.95.....drink included...I still leave $2.00.
ie--Only had rude service 1x in 25 years.
Reply to
Richard Neidich

"Richard Neidich" skrev i melding news:KRo2e.8653$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
is 0% - zero. Standard would be about 5, very good 10%. People with expense accounts use to go higher, however, if they want to show off... :-) Anything above 15 would be very excessive. Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

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