Help with Italian wine dinner


For my birthday this year (in about a month) I'm having another tasting, which has become a custom. This year, the theme is Italian wines.
Once again, as the host, I'll be responsible for planning and preparing the main course, something we can sit down for amidst an otherwise haphazard array of wines and hors d'ouevres and later, desserts.
The wine I'll be serving up this year is 2001 Damilano Barolo (perhaps 2 bottles so there's enough to go around). This is an apparently early-drinking Barolo which WS rated 60th last year in their top 100. I may also contribute a Brunello, as there's a great Italian wine merchant (The Clown, in Portland, ME) down the street from my office which has a few currently mature vintages for sale.
Question is, what can I serve with Barolo that would feed 8-10 people? I'm looking for something that would compliment the wine, obviously. Portions need not (and indeed should not) be large.
Thanks in advance for any advice.
- Chris
Reply to
Chris Sprague

Chris Sprague ha scritto:
You can try the classic pairing with a "brasato" stewed in a good nebbiolo. Not original, I know, but it works.
Luk
Reply to
Luk

Normally, with a mature Barolo I'd suggest something like pappardelle with wild boar sauce or white truffle risotto. In your case, because it's so young, I'd think that perhaps beef or lamb might be better suited for it.
Mark Lipton
Reply to
Mark Lipton

Oops,
I somehow erased my comment. Like Luk, I suggested brasato al Barolo. A search for brasato here will pick up some links to recipes. If you can find a cheaper Nebbiolo for cooking , that's my preference, but a Barbera, Cotes du Rhone, or Zinfandel might work for recipe. Some acidity is needed (I'd not cook with Dolcetto).
Truffles and mushrooms are great accents to Barolo,but more mature ones.
The Clown is a quirky but cool store (half antiques, basement is wine for those who haven't been). Betsy played a chamber festival in Portland a couple times, I found bargains on closeout Jermanns, etc.
Reply to
DaleW

Of course, you're doing everything backwards.
(Shakes head and slams fist into wall......)
Reply to
UC

You're so right. They should be tasting it first. :)
Jose
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"There are 3 secrets to the perfect landing. Unfortunately, nobody knows 
what they are."  - (mike).
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Reply to
Jose

No, he should be thinking about the food first, and the wine as an accompaniment. This guy is insane....
Reply to
UC

Uh... why? Granted that "wine is meant to be drunk with food", what is wrong with "I have a bottle of wine, what food shall I drink it with?"
Jose
--
"There are 3 secrets to the perfect landing. Unfortunately, nobody knows 
what they are."  - (mike).
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Reply to
Jose

I have no idea what to say in the face of such 'logic'....
Reply to
UC

I understand if UC's parameters are adopted, in parts of Sicily and Napoli-the "wine police" will punish people who drink wines without food---Castration is the punishment for the first offense, in Torino its only confiscation of the family's expresso machine.(smile)
Reply to
Joe \"Beppe\"Rosenberg

OK UC, so I'm planning a party where I plan to make Brasato al Barolo for some guests. What wine should I serve with it?
Reply to
Chris Sprague

That's an easy one: Nero d'Avola or Sangiovese di Romagna. If that's not available, then Lagrein Scuro, Chianti Classico or Montepulciano d'Abruzzo.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay

Do you have some examples of the wines mentioned above that you can recommend? What constitutes "cheaper Nebbiolo", for instance?
I also didn't find much here in the way of recipes, but had some luck searching Google in general. Does anyone have any favorites?
Reply to
Chris Sprague

Occasionally one can find deals on lesser Barbaresco (Premier Cru had some '98s & '99s from lesser known producers for $10ish, but a more common find of Nebbiolo in the under $15 range would be a Nebbiolo d'Alba, Nebbiolo di Langhe, Ghemme, Spanna, etc. Even there you won't find the top producers for under $20, but some solid workhorse ones are fine for cooking.
Betsy likes both the one one from Biba Caggiano's "Northern Italian Cooking", and the one on the www.made-in-italy.com website. I think the Professor suggested Kramer's Passion for Piedmont book.
Reply to
DaleW

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