Wine & Fish

What would be some nice wines to try that can be purchased at the LCBO with Fish. I am heading over to someone house Christmas eve and I am going to bring a bottle of wine. Perfer drier wines over sweeter.
Reply to
Christopher Black
Assuming I am very new to the world of wine and have only tried only few really good wines (Sassicai, Opus One, and a few Others)
Explain to be what a RBDN and all the other abervations stand for?
Reply to
Christopher Black
Greetings;
For the enlightenment of the acronym challenged, LCBO stands for Liquor Control Board of Ontario.
My recommendation for a nice fish compatible wine would be Ontario's Peninsula Ridge Sauvignon Blanc.
Enjoy
Reply to
Chuck Reid
: On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 10:49:17 -0500, "Christopher Black" : : >What would be some nice wines to try that can be purchased at the LCBO : : : RBDN would be nice. : or some WUP or maybe a PONT or a nice dry FUT. :-)
Chris, the point being made is that the majority of readers/posters won't know that LCBO stands for liquor control board of Ontario. Also, fish is a fairly vague description so it is hard to give a recommendation. For example, I like to have Pinot Noir with salmon, Chardonnay with Black Cod/Sablefish etc. So a bit more information will be helpful for the group.
When in doubt, Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand is a real crowd pleaser. Tim
Reply to
Tim O'Connor
"Christopher Black" wrote in news:cq9gli$vvb$ snipped-for-privacy@rumours.uwaterloo.ca:
The Bouchard Rully that I see on the LCBO web site is what I am having for Christmas (too many non wine lovers to break out the more sexpensive stuff) but the Rully is a very nice affordable Chardonnay that should work with fish. I would search also for a St Veran or an affordable Pouilly Fuisse. or Chablis or getting more pricey into the Montrachets such as Chassange-Montrachet. I depends on your price point
Good luck
Reply to
jcoulter
Ya, sorry about that I was under the impression that is news group was only for Ontario and all. So that brings up a question, how big is the audience in this new group, where is everyone from?
Anyways thanks so far for all the comments and stuff. As for the type of fish, well I think they will be smoke salmon and stuff for the Appetizer, and then Sea Bass, Tilapia maybe even a bit of tuna for the main course and tiger shrimp and stuff like that and lots of different stuff.
As for the request for a lower priced wine, there are two reasons first I am still a Graduate Student and money is tight these days and secondly there is no point in buying a really good wine if they really can't tell the difference. Not to sound rude or anything.
Reply to
Christopher Black
In article , snipped-for-privacy@uwaterloo.ca says...
Imagine the entirity of the Usenet. That probably covers the gamut of subscribers to this NG. Don't feel bad, as many in the US start with the assumption that "everyone" is a yank and we prattle on about US specific wines - myself included.
As for the fish, the preperation is probably the determining factor in the wine selection. Oh, there are some selections (some already listed in reply), that are great "general" wines. One should not go too far wrong. A caveat, however, the sauce, or other aspects of the actual dish can influence the choice greatly.
For salmon, an OR/US Pinot Noir (PN) is a great place to start. Same for an OR Pinot Grigio, if one wants white. I enjoy PN's (usually with a touch more fruit, like a CA/US Carneros with tuna, but a lot depends on the preperation.
Sauvignon Blancs (SB's) are a good start, as their acid works well to cut through some of the more "fishy" oily tasts, like a squeeze of lemon.
Lighter style Chardonnays also do well with a lot of seafood. Add a heavy cream sauce, though, and a fuller-bodied Chard can mesh quite well.
Syrah, especially New World Syrah/Shiraz can go well with a lot of fish. Had a Voss Napa Shiraz (yes, I know, but his wife is from OZ), with a talapia the other night and it was exquisite. The fish was lightly breaded and then pan seared. I think that a SB, or PN would have gone just as well.
Hunt
Reply to
The Bulldog
In news:cq9ph8$5ti$ snipped-for-privacy@rumours.uwaterloo.ca,
All over the world. There are people here from the US, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, etc. I'm in Arizona, myself.
But to return to your original question, there's really no such thing as a wine that's good with "fish." "Fish" is a very broad category, and what's good with one kind of fish may not be so good with the next kind. And over and above the kind of fish, what wines work well with it also depends on how it's prepared, sauced, etc.
Reply to
Ken Blake
Ok, well they will prepared very plan as some of the people I am eating with high high blood pressure and can not have rich foods.
Reply to
Christopher Black

We have Scandinavians, Kiwis, Ozzies, Cannucks, an Italian raised Canadian living in France, a Brit residing in France, a majority of US residents, a few Austrians (one of them myself), and I am sure I forgot just about half of the regulars.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay
"Christopher Black" wrote in news:cqa1vs$b1e$ snipped-for-privacy@rumours.uwaterloo.ca:
you would do well with a Pinot Grigiot or a Gavi from Italy. Goes well with a lot of different fish dishes especially those prepared plainly
Reply to
jcoulter
Why don't you lurk awhile instead of lurching and get to know what is going on. We are always happy to have another member but please remember to send me your membership check for $23.72 CA right away.
Reply to
Bill Loftin
LoL Nice, must have missed the part about the poor student thing. LoL
Will stay a while and look around. I enjoy many things, two of which include Beer and Wine so it will be fun to hang around.
Reply to
Christopher Black
"Christopher Black" wrote in news:cqa45l$caf$ snipped-for-privacy@rumours.uwaterloo.ca:
student discount is 16.43CAD stamps are accepted
Reply to
jcoulter
In article , the_bulldog@the_doghouse.com says...
All excellent advice, except for any decent American wine in this particular case. After exchange, markups, and very high sales taxes to two levels of governments, at the LCBO good American wines are poor price values compared to most Australian and even some Italian wines.
Ravenswood 2001 Vitners Blend California Zinfadel and a basic Robert Mondavi Coastal Private Selection retail for $20 CAN at the LCBO. I think they go for just under $10 US in Detroit.
A good quality Oregon Pinot Noir, St. Innocent's (Willamette Valley), Seven Springs Vineyard was $49 CAN for I believe the 2001. What is it in the US, $25? Most "decent" Oregon and California wines start at almost $30 CAN at the LCBO.
At the LCBO, Ontario and B.C. VQA designations, Austalian and some Italians would be more of a bang for the buck choice for a student. Each fair size outlet has a Vintages corner or area, and most of the "featured" wines from the aforementioned locales are priced at $15 - $25 CAN. There are always little gems from small and big producers not found on the regular shelves, which are for volume production.
Dennis (Windsor, Ontario)
Reply to
Dennis Rekuta
"Tom S" wrote in news:Pd5yd.1698$yV1.143 @newssvr14.news.prodigy.com:
There was a semi regular a year or so ago from Singapore. And I now we have a lurker from South Africa becasue he sent me information for a trip I didn't take (still in the planning stages trying to figure out how to make SA a little closer cos it is a damn long flight from Atlanta)
Reply to
jcoulter
Actually, Rully comes in both rouge and blanc. A Rully rouge (Pinot Noir based) may work with salmon. Many fish dishes can go either red or white, depending on the preparation.Rully would be a lighter bodied red, more suitable than, say, a Cabernet.
Tom Schellberg
Reply to
Xyzsch

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