Real ale in the Irish Repubic

We're going to County Kerry in August. Are there any pubs over there which sell real ale, or is it all just the usual Guinness, Murphy's etc?
--- Brian
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Brian
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BrianW
BrianW a écrit : > We're going to County Kerry in August. Are there any pubs over there > which sell real ale, or is it all just the usual Guinness, Murphy's etc?
Just looked up Ron Pattinson's European Beer Guide :
No pubs indicated in County Kerry... (
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) but Ron clearly states his list is not that complete.
His brewery list, though (
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) mentions one micro in County Kerry : Kinsale Brewing Co. (
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)
That may be a starting point, contacting them to ask if they can provide you with a lis of pubs they deliver to regularly.
Cheers !
Laurent
-- Warning : you may encounter French language beyond this point.
..."surgie du fond de son délire, une litote blanche et noire heurta le miroir dans un nuage de débris étincelants, et se rua, griffes dehors, sur le pauvre Vizir ! Elle le mordit cruellement au lobe auriculaire droit, et disparut dans un tiroir..." (F'murrr)
Laurent Mousson, Berne, Switzerland
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The Submarine Captain
> BrianW a =E9crit : >=20 >> We're going to County Kerry in August. Are there any pubs over there=20 >> which sell real ale, or is it all just the usual Guinness, Murphy's et= c? >=20 > Just looked up Ron Pattinson's European Beer Guide : >=20 > No pubs indicated in County Kerry...=20 > (
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) but Ron clearly states his= =20 > list is not that complete. >=20 > His brewery list, though (
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)=20 > mentions one micro in County Kerry : Kinsale Brewing Co.=20 > (
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) >=20 > That may be a starting point, contacting them to ask if they can provid= e=20 > you with a lis of pubs they deliver to regularly. >=20 > Cheers ! >=20 > Laurent >=20 Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say=20 it's pasteurised. I've emailed them to ask where their outlets are.
Brian
Reply to
BrianW
BrianW a écrit : > Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say > it's pasteurised.
Well, Brian, I fear that with the stranglehold of the big boys on beer distribution in Eire, cask stuff must be, like on the continent, be considered as the icing on the cake... The hunt is rather for anything out of the ordinary, and preferably decent, even if it's not necessarily cask ale. ;o)
Cheers !
Laurent
-- Warning : you may encounter French language beyond this point.
..."surgie du fond de son délire, une litote blanche et noire heurta le miroir dans un nuage de débris étincelants, et se rua, griffes dehors, sur le pauvre Vizir ! Elle le mordit cruellement au lobe auriculaire droit, et disparut dans un tiroir..." (F'murrr)
Laurent Mousson, Berne, Switzerland
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Reply to
The Submarine Captain
In message , The Submarine Captain writes >BrianW a écrit : > >> Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say >>it's pasteurised. > >Well, Brian, I fear that with the stranglehold of the big boys on beer >distribution in Eire, cask stuff must be, like on the continent, be >considered as the icing on the cake... >The hunt is rather for anything out of the ordinary, and preferably >decent, even if it's not necessarily cask ale. ;o) > >Cheers ! > >Laurent > > > On which note, I was on a flying visit a few weeks ago and sampled a bottled wheat beer from the Carlow Brewery. It was a chance purchase (in fact from a Belfast offie). Not the sort of thing I was expecting to find, and I know nothing whatever of its background, but it was certainly a pleasant drink.
Dave -- Dave Spencer
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Dave Spencer
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Dave Spencer
I have a trip to Carlow in a couple of weeks, anyone have any advance information? I'll report back any findings. > In message , The Submarine Captain > writes > >BrianW a écrit : > > > >> Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say > >>it's pasteurised. > > > >Well, Brian, I fear that with the stranglehold of the big boys on beer > >distribution in Eire, cask stuff must be, like on the continent, be > >considered as the icing on the cake... > >The hunt is rather for anything out of the ordinary, and preferably > >decent, even if it's not necessarily cask ale. ;o) > > > >Cheers ! > > > >Laurent > > > > > > > On which note, I was on a flying visit a few weeks ago and sampled a > bottled wheat beer from the Carlow Brewery. It was a chance purchase (in > fact from a Belfast offie). Not the sort of thing I was expecting to > find, and I know nothing whatever of its background, but it was > certainly a pleasant drink. > > Dave > -- > Dave Spencer
Reply to
Simon Cooper
Thanks for the suggestions. I've emailed the two breweries mentioned to see if I can find out if there are any outlets in the Kerry area.
--- Brian
--
Brian
Reply to
BrianW
> Thanks for the suggestions. I've emailed the two breweries mentioned > to see if I can find out if there are any outlets in the Kerry area. > > --- > Brian
We found nothing in Kerry worth drinking last year. Some great pubs though. Biddy Early brewery is not too far up North in County Mayo.
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Brett
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Brett
Reply to
Brett...
> >> Thanks for the suggestions. I've emailed the two breweries mentioned >> to see if I can find out if there are any outlets in the Kerry area. >> >> --- >> Brian > >We found nothing in Kerry worth drinking last year. Some great pubs though. >Biddy Early brewery is not too far up North in County Mayo.
Don't expect any real ale though. When I was last at Biddy Early's, it had CAMRA certificates all over the place, but the (admittedly good) beers were the fizzy keg version. It's a sod of a place to get to without a car as well.
Ennis is well worth a visit for the craic, though :-)
-- Regards
Mike (posting from Vienna)
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Regards

Mike
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Mike Roebuck
> I have a trip to Carlow in a couple of weeks, anyone have any advance > information? > I'll report back any findings. >
Carlow Brewery is right by the train station, which is about 1hr20 from Dublin Heuston station on the Waterford line. 15euro return. Right now they're not doing any tours as they're having new plant put in. Huge stack of kegs outside led me to ask about cask. The bloke said they do some, but not much. Most of it goes to England, but he recommended a place on the road to Cork. They sell cases of bottles on site, but not smaller orders.
Dublin - I stayed in the area around Trinity College. Found a nice place around there called the Ginger Man (or Gin German) selling non-cask micros from Cork, and another place on the Liffey across from O Connel St selling it's own brews on keg. Guinness is doing a "seasonal" thing, and qite a few places are currently carrying their "Toucan Brew", which has less roasted bitterness, and hence seems a little smoother. This is the second in a planned line, so seems to be a step in the right direction. Just can't see them rolling out "Real Cask Guinness" at the end of it...
Reply to
Simon Cooper
> Thanks for the suggestions. I've emailed the two breweries mentioned to > see if I can find out if there are any outlets in the Kerry area.
And neither of them had the courtesy to reply!
-- Brian
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Brian
Reply to
BrianW
>"Simon Cooper" wrote in message >news:meudnbEJepswslfZnZ2dnUVZ_sudnZ2d@comcast.com... >> I have a trip to Carlow in a couple of weeks, anyone have any advance >> information? >> I'll report back any findings. >> > >Carlow Brewery is right by the train station, which is about 1hr20 from >Dublin Heuston station on the Waterford line. 15euro return. Right now >they're not doing any tours as they're having new plant put in. Huge stack >of kegs outside led me to ask about cask. The bloke said they do some, but >not much. Most of it goes to England, but he recommended a place on the >road to Cork. They sell cases of bottles on site, but not smaller orders. > >Dublin - I stayed in the area around Trinity College. Found a nice place >around there called the Ginger Man (or Gin German) selling non-cask micros >from Cork, and another place on the Liffey across from O Connel St selling >it's own brews on keg. Guinness is doing a "seasonal" thing, and qite a few >places are currently carrying their "Toucan Brew", which has less roasted >bitterness, and hence seems a little smoother. This is the second in a >planned line, so seems to be a step in the right direction. Just can't see >them rolling out "Real Cask Guinness" at the end of it... >
Not at all sure that a dumbed down version of a dumbed down beer is anything to celebrate.
If they brought out a full flavoured bitter stout in unpasteurised form with a good dose of East Kent Goldings and a really roast flavour (like what's that drink again? Oh yes - Guinness as it used to be) that'd be a step worth rasing a glass to.
Or like Porterhouse Wrasslers 4X is!
Peter
Reply to
Peter Alexander
>> Thanks for the suggestions. I've emailed the two breweries mentioned >> to see if I can find out if there are any outlets in the Kerry area. > > And neither of them had the courtesy to reply! >
But no doubt their offerings were available at the Sneem beer festival, the evening before we left for home.
The previous evening they had apparently featured beers from Poland, including (sic) Staropramen.
As for me, I don't care if I never see another pint of Guinness (or Murphys) again in my whole life! I didn't try the Bulmers or Smithwicks...
-- Brian
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Brian
Reply to
BrianW
> BrianW a écrit : > >> Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say >> it's pasteurised. > > Well, Brian, I fear that with the stranglehold of the big boys on beer > distribution in Eire, cask stuff must be, like on the continent, be > considered as the icing on the cake... > The hunt is rather for anything out of the ordinary, and preferably > decent, even if it's not necessarily cask ale. ;o) > > Cheers ! > > Laurent
Laurent - how do you speak such good English? You sound like one of the locals down my pub. -- Cliff Laine, Flat 957, The Old Lard Factory, Lancaster
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Cliff Laine, Flat 957, The Old Lard Factory, Lancaster
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loobyloo
>=20 >> BrianW a =E9crit : >> >>> Thanks Laurent. Their beer appears to be filtered, but it doesn't say= =20 >>> it's pasteurised.=20 >> Well, Brian, I fear that with the stranglehold of the big boys on beer= =20 >> distribution in Eire, cask stuff must be, like on the continent, be=20 >> considered as the icing on the cake... >> The hunt is rather for anything out of the ordinary, and preferably=20 >> decent, even if it's not necessarily cask ale. ;o) >> >> Cheers ! >> >> Laurent >=20 > Laurent - how do you speak such good English? You sound like one of th= e > locals down my pub.
Because he's Swiss. They learn three languages from birth, so adding a=20 fourth is no problem. ;-)
And no Laurent, I didn't find anything interesting when I was there -=20 although one pub did have a couple of draught German beers.
--=20 Brian
Reply to
BrianW
BrianW a écrit : >> Laurent - how do you speak such good English? You sound like one of the >> locals down my pub. > Just doing me best, Ma'am ! ;o) > Because he's Swiss. They learn three languages from birth, so adding a > fourth is no problem. ;-) Nice myth, Brian, but it's not quite as rosy as that... ;o) I'm a native french speaker, which isn't necessarily that good a starting point. I've been taught german from 11 years old on, but still couldn't really put a sentence together eight years' schooling later. I only activated it when I moved into the german-speaking part nine years ago, and found myself able to speak it not too badly within weeks. Partly because in-between I'd been able to "crack" understanding german, after reachiong a good level with nglish. The one central skill here is being able to go aroung the word you don't understand in a sentence, and then, once you've got the whole context, deduct what its meaning could be. English I was taught from the age of 13 on, it came a lot more quickly, because I was motivated enough. I must have got the basics, including sentence pattern and a general "feel" of the language, listening to the Betles as a teenager, then, followed an iontensive course in Bristol in 1990 (where I realised that the beer on handpump at the pub two doors away from the language school was brewed further down the street at the Smiles Brewery, and that it was no only good but a damn sight tastier tahn the then-ubiquitous Courage), passed my Certificate of Proficiency in english by the skin of my teeth... but then it's like your driving test : you learn how to pass it, not really how to drive... So I ended up teaching myself proper british english using "Monty Pythons Flying Circus" on video, watching an episode a day, twice or thrice, with the remote in one hand and the book containing the scripts in the other hand. The tricky bit ever since has been to maintain my english current. The principle : find something that interests you in the language you need to train : book magazine, film, newspaper, whaterver, and chances are good you'll end up concentrating on its contents rather than the language it's delivered in. Beery literature in english has been one thing I used, but ever since the advent of DVD, I've appreciated being able to watch english-language films with english subtitles. Reading what you hear and hearing what you read is a tremendously painless way to train your language skills. Problem is french or german DVDs all too rarely come with subtitles in the same language as the film. :o( > And no Laurent, I didn't find anything interesting when I was there - > although one pub did have a couple of draught German beers.
Sad state of things it is, then... :o((
Cheers !
Laurent
-- Warning : you may encounter French language beyond this point.
...Maintenant, tout le monde il va savoir que les alpages sont en polystyrène de cheval !! (F'murrr)
Laurent Mousson, Berne, Switzerland
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Reply to
The Submarine Captain
> The principle : find something that interests you in the language you > need to train : book magazine, film, newspaper, whaterver, and chances > are good you'll end up concentrating on its contents rather than the > language it's delivered in.
The principle works for virtually anything. It is why amateurs are frequently better at things than most of the "professionals" in the same subject. Plain and simple a love of the subject aids learning.
If people just stop and think about the word "amateur" they will realise why, and also see that the put downs of amateurs by professionals just represent sour grapes.
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Steve Pampling
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Steve Pampling
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Steven Pampling

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