is there a philospohy of food pairing?

When reading about what foods to pair together, i wondered if there was was a general science or philosophy of pairing foods.
My guess is the goal to maximize pleasure. Using the human mind and human tasting hardare, is there a general way to maximize pleasure through food combinations?
Reply to
Howard Schwartz
in news:10uvm29ih8kfra0 @news.supernews.com:
It is a matter of what your palate likes in terms of tastes and textures. the general red with meat white with fish is an example. Dover sole is fairly light and would not usually be prepared like beeef with a brown sauce, similarly one would keep the wine lighter.
Salmon as is often noted is a heavier fish and like Tuna lends itself to fine mates with red wines. Tuna steak is one fish that I have trouble matching with a white at all.
Reply to
jcoulter
wrote:
As jcoulter pointed out, there are some guidelines but it is really a very personal thing. You will hear a lot of dos and donts about asparagus, olives, peanuts, spinach, soups, cheeses, but almost all can be proven wrong. There are some guidelines such as those provided by jcoulter, they are a good start.
Look up the archives of this NG and you will find some good threads about food and wine matching. Ian has theorized at length about this, and he is a very good food-wine matchmaker.
Mike Tommasi, Six Fours, France email link
formatting link
Reply to
Mike Tommasi
A typical Italian dinner structure should be studied, in any Italian cookbook.
Start here:
formatting link

I grabbed these from the internet too: --------------------- The meal starts with an antipasto, which simple means before the meal and can be almost anything. The meal then follows with pasta or soup, then the entrée. The vegetable and salad may be served with the entrée or as the next course. Followed by cheese and fruit and desserts on a special occasion (like a dinner party). Finally the meal ends with a nice cup of coffee. The meal itself is served with a nice bottle of wine thought out the meal, rather than a different wine with each course.
------------------------------------------ The first course was usually an antipasto of meats (Prosciutto, salami and ham), marinated vegetables, cheese such as provolone and mozzarella, and roasted red peppers. You'd better take a little walk after that course to get ready for the following items. There might be a soup course; a stuffed pasta dish such as homemade ravioli, lasagna or manicotti; meat that was cooked with the gravy including meatballs, sausage and braciole; roasted chicken and/or roast beef. Sweet potatoes, stuffed artichokes, salad and string beans could all serve as accompaniments.
The dessert course completed the final couple of hours since it included fresh figs or other seasonal fruit, cakes, pignoli cookies and Italian pastries. Nuts in the shell sat in bowls, waiting to be cracked and picked over as the grownups engaged in heated discussions.
------------------------------------------------------------- If you don't want to cook Italian, I have nothing to say...
Reply to
uraniumcommittee
I even have a Roman cookbook.
With 2000+ years of cooking and wine-making experience, it is to Italy one should look. The only reason that F____ has grapes is because the Romans brought them there, so the generals would have something to do. The Gauls had no wine-making cuilture.
All roads lead to Rome.
Reply to
uraniumcommittee
In article , snipped-for-privacy@spam.com says...
Howard,
There are no "hard and fast" rules for food-wine pairing. There are about six things that can happen:
1. The food and wine are good and enhance each other, equaling a sum greater than the respective parts. 2. The food and wine are good and the food gets better with the wine, but the wine, pretty much, stays the same. 3.) The food and wine are good and the wine gets better with the food, but the food is not enhanced by the wine. 4.) The food and wine are good, the wine stays the same, but the food doesn't work with it. 5.) The food and wine are good, the food stays the same, but the wine doesn't work with it. 6.) The food and wine are good, but combined, neither is nearly so good.
There are several ways to pair food-wine. You can look for similar textures, like salmon (some fat and smooth texture in the mouth) and Pinot Noir (usually smooth and silky in the mouth). One can look for similar taste characteristics, and textures, or you can actually look for opposites, as these can definitely be sauces, etc., like raspberries and a Merlot, with raspberries in its flavor profile. Smokey grilled meat pairs with Syrah, especially from the Northern Rhône. If the meat is fatty, like beef, then the tannins of a Cab, or maybe a Merlot, will cut through the fat and usually marry with the flavors of the beef - this is an opposite texture, but works. An affinity of flavors, like a cream sauce, will often work well with a " buttery" white, like many CA/US Chardonnays.
Here we have similarities, or opposites, in textures, tastes, etc. I like to serve raw walnut halves with a young Cab, because the tannins in the raw walnuts often overcome the tannins in a young Cab. Even some of the "tried ‘n true" matches have been discussed here. There are probably few that work for everyone - it's a matter of personal tastes.
As has been stated, you might want to do a Google.Groups search in this news group for "food wine pairings" as much has been written. These could easily work as starting points for you. I don't think I have ever seen anyone posting pairings that I feel are ludicrous, but I suppose it has happened. Though not all work for ME, I assume that they DID work for the poster.
The best place to go, after you have looked at the back posts, is to do some good food, and then see how your palette reacts to good wine paired with it. Sometimes, we get into a bit of a rut, as I do with almost always pairing smokey duck with Côte Rótie. Recently others have headed in a different direction, but so long as it works for me, I tend to not deviate too far from it.
Back to my list at the top to this post: 1-3 are more often the case, than are 4-6, so have fun and enjoy - best of all with good friends, or loved ones.
Hunt
Reply to
Hunt
Hi Howard just read the thread and the answers all refer to food & wine pairing. Is this what you were asking? I read that you were asking about pairing just FOODS e.g. Tomatoes & Basil (Yes for you Mr Scarpitti :) ) Could you clarify please. Cheers Andrew
Reply to
Andrew Goldfinch
My intention was broader than wine and fine, but that's good too. In your example, why are tomatoes and basil a good pairing? And can that information be used to suggest other pairings that one might not have thought of otherwise.
Reply to
Howard Schwartz

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.