Blueberry wine - yeast suggestion?

Hi,
I'll be soon making a blueberry wine, any suggestions on the best yeast to use for a - dry blueberry wine
- semi-dry blueberry wine
Thanks, Steve
Reply to
Steve Thompson
Can you tell me what brand is EC-119 Stephen sg
| I tried (i think) the EC-119, and a champagne yeast and both worked well | |
| > Hi, | > | > I'll be soon making a blueberry wine, any suggestions on the best yeast to | > use for a | > - dry blueberry wine | > | > - semi-dry blueberry wine | > | > Thanks, | > Steve | > | > | |
Reply to
Stephen SG

Prise de Mousse (EC1118, I think). Very active fermenter that is a good "closer", all the way up to ~18% alcohol.
Epernay II (Côte de Blancs). Slow fermenter that easily stops off-dry and has relatively low alcohol tolerance (~13-14%). That makes it good for sweet wines.
Tom S
Reply to
Tom S
I have found this to be an excellent yeast; can't recommend it too highly! REX
Reply to
Oberon Rex
Can you check, as they don't seem to have this in there range. Stephen SG
| I think that's Lalvin | |
| > Can you tell me what brand is EC-119 | > Stephen sg | >
| > | I tried (i think) the EC-119, and a champagne yeast and both worked well | > | | > |
| > | > Hi, | > | > | > | > I'll be soon making a blueberry wine, any suggestions on the best | yeast | > to | > | > use for a | > | > - dry blueberry wine | > | > | > | > - semi-dry blueberry wine | > | > | > | > Thanks, | > | > Steve | > | > | > | > | > | | > | | > | > | |
Reply to
Stephen SG
Tom I draw your attention to this information:-
(This is a popular yeast for producing light fruity style white and blush wines, and Epernay is also popular for producing wines made from fruit other than grapes. Sometimes Epernay is used for producing a light, fruity style Chardonnay wines. However, Chardonnay can be difficult to ferment completely, and stuck fermentation often results when Epernay yeast is used with Chardonnay. Chardonnay wines fermented with Epernay yeast should be closely monitored and tested for residual sugar.
Epernay is used at fermentation temperatures ranging from 50 to 70 degrees. Under these conditions, it produces slow, controlled fermentations, and volatile components in the juice are retained well. Excessive foaming is seldom a problem when Epernay is used. Epernay does not ferment well at low temperatures, and it is very sensitive to sudden changes in fermentation temperature (cold shock). Epernay yeast is often used when winemakers intend to leave some residual sugar in a wine. Usually, active Epernay fermentations can be stopped just by lowering the temperature of the tank.
Epernay yeast is sensitive to high alcohol levels. Consequently, Epernay should not be used in juices with high Brix values unless some residual sugar is wanted. Epernay yeast can produce very pleasant, fruity aroma characteristics in young wines, and home winemakers use Epernay yeast for fermenting fruit wines because of the fruity aromas produced. This yeast is available in five gram packets, 500 gram packages and in bulk form.)
Stephen SG
|
| > Hi, | > | > I'll be soon making a blueberry wine, any suggestions on the best yeast to | > use for a | > - dry blueberry wine | | Prise de Mousse (EC1118, I think). Very active fermenter that is a good | "closer", all the way up to ~18% alcohol. | | > - semi-dry blueberry wine | | Epernay II (Côte de Blancs). Slow fermenter that easily stops off-dry and | has relatively low alcohol tolerance (~13-14%). That makes it good for | sweet wines. | | Tom S | |
Reply to
Stephen SG
Thanks, but there's nothing in that that I wasn't already aware of from personal experience. Those are also the reasons I recommended Epernay II for a blueberry wine that the original poster wanted to make in an off-dry style.
Tom S
Reply to
Tom S

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