I have met the enemy and it is...


2007 Laboure Roi Pouilly Fuisse which I had with dinner last night at a terrible bistro on Marco Island Florida. I'm not sure why I'm bitching since it was my choice but given that I had 4 whites and 4 reds to choose from and two of eight were white zins, I did the best I could. The 2007 Laboure Roi Pouilly Fuisse redefines acidty. It had the kind of throat searing acidiy that I would imagine is much like drinking lye even though lye is akaline. Zero fruit, zero body just pure acidic zing...to the max. "F"
Reply to
Bi!!

One of those really sad lists. Sorry about that. People keep telling me that Laboure Roi is getting better, but still my reference point for bad negociant Burg. Let's hope your wine's arrive soon!
Reply to
DaleW

When I go to my local Carrefour supermarket, the burg section is mostly occupied by Labouré Roi. I have tried these wines twice and I also gave them an F. In fact I almost always skip the wine section at the supermarket.
OTOH I did stray into that area last week, and happened by the little wine "fridge" where the expensive stuff id kept. I found two half bottles of 94 Yquem at 78€ each. I bought them... seemed like a good deal to me.
--
Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France
email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail
Reply to
Mike Tommasi

Laboure-Roi is also available at a higher end Spanish hypermarket chain (Hipercor) and usually part of promotional campaigns of European wines or European Food.
A few years ago I tried three or four bottlings and I remember that a 2005 Chablis PC Fourchaume was quite decent and, at 8 euros/bottle, quite a good QPR. But the rest of the range that I tasted, included some lesser reds from Cote d'Or, were abhorrent.
s.
Reply to
santiago

On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 18:51:03 -0800 (PST), "Bi!!" wrote:
I never tried it but really... your post is SCARING!!!
It's interesting to know that at Gotham Wines, the item strangely disappeared!! one more point for the supernatural idea of this wine.
$15.99 USD for such wine is really another scaring point.. so this wine is going to be a real GHOUL between the wines... scaring and horrible.
I think that acidity is something to avoid at all costs, I prefer fruit, not always body, because there are wines that I consider "happy wines", easy to drink and very important during a casual party.
Probably the body is absolutely a must during serious meetings.
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Reply to
Kyle

"Bi!!" skrev i melding news: snipped-for-privacy@v7g2000vbd.googlegroups.com...
I would agree that Laboure-Roi sells fairly standard or pedestrian wine with a few good exceptions. But it is also true that Pouilly-Fuisse wines often have relatively high acidity contributing to their sought-after freshness... It would seem that Americans often look for low-acid wines - perhaps more used to malolactically fermented wines so common in the past over there? Any comments to that?
There are actually people who demand high acidity in their white wines - me, for instance :-), happily drinking zingy Mosel wines.
Anders
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

On Jan 14, 9:24=A0am, "Anders T rneskog" wrote:
snipped-for-privacy@v7g2000vbd.googlegroups.com...
ith
that
me,
Americans are not always adverse to high acidity. For instance there is candy that many children love that is loaded with very high acidity, but the fruit and sugar tend to balance this somewhat. I once knew an engineer who would eat a lemon without anything added, but this is very much the exception, and even a lemon has considerable fruity taste to mask the extremely high acidity just a bit. I like good Mosel too, but I find few of grades below auslese ( and there can be a trocken auslese) that have enough taste intensity to balance the sometimes high acidity. The fine trocken exceptions can be very fine indeed, but tend to be produced only from the best estates in the best years. Many Americans will squeeze a bit of lemon juice on their shrimp, and a bit of high acid dry wine can serve the same purpose if you sip a bit as you eat the shrimp. Clos Ste.Hune is bone dry and does not undergo malolactic secondary fermentation. As a result it is very sharp and austere when young. However with at least 10 years of age, it develops great intensity of bouquet and taste which balances the wine and makes it one of the top Rieslings of the world. There can be Pouilly-Fuisse with enough taste and bouquet to balance the often high acidity, but this seems to be very much the exception, at least for most that gets exported to the US. To make matters worse, this wine seldom improves with age.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

On Jan 14, 10:24=EF=BF=BDam, "Anders T rneskog" wrote:
snipped-for-privacy@v7g2000vbd.googlegroups.com...
=BF=BDIt had
just
ith
seem that
=BDAny
me,
Anders, there is a difference between fresh acidic wines and drinking razor blades. :-) I like well balanced wines with a nice acidic component and if you read my TN's from over the years you will find that my tastes run fairly Old World but this is just bad wine. I've had Laboure Roi wines in the past and found them to be fairly pedestrian "quaffers" but this was just beyond the realm of good taste and it has nothing to do with Americanized tastes.
Reply to
Bi!!

"Bi!!" skrev i melding news: snipped-for-privacy@q41g2000vba.googlegroups.com...
Yes, I know you have a wide ranging experience. So, if this was not a malolactically conditioned sensory response :-) - could this have been a faulty bottle? You see, I don't find other notes for Laboure-Roi PF pointing out that kind of acidity. It could be a vintage aberration..., look at these notes for L-R PF 2006: Bouquet: Ripe pear, hazelnut, citrus, buttered bread with floral and cedar notes.
Taste: Round and balanced with nice acidity. Structured and rich with ripe white fruit flavors. Nice mineral and green apple lingering finish. IIt will develop nicely in the cellar.
So something is wrong here, and if not you, then perhaps the bottle?
Anders
.
Reply to
Anders Tørneskog

On Jan 14, 2:29=A0pm, "Anders T=F8rneskog" wrote:
snipped-for-privacy@q41g2000vba.googlegroups.com...
een a
nd
for
r
e
ill
Well, 2006 is certainly a less acidic vintage in Burgundy than 2007 (I tend to prefer 2007). But the other factor is that I'd guess that L- R PF is probably produced in the thousands (or tens of thousands) of cases, from a large number of sources. Variation is always at least a possibility in these very large negoce operations.
Reply to
DaleW

On Jan 14, 2:29=EF=BF=BDpm, "Anders T=EF=BF=BDrneskog" wrote:
snipped-for-privacy@q41g2000vba.googlegroups.com...
I've
not a
this have been a
nd
notes for
r
e
ill
Well, certainly the vintage would have a significant effect and tasting notes for a 2006 wouldn't necessarily tranlate to the 2007 vintage. I couldn't really find any notes from sources that weren't trying to sell the wine. I did see the note posted by The Atlanta Examiner that you posted (which is not a website I'm familiar with nor the "wine expert" that they cite) and it appears to be a commercial for a grocery store or wine shop. Basically the wine sucked and I don't think it was bottle variation. It sells for about $15-$18 in the American market at retail so perhaps someone else can buy a bottle and post a note.
Reply to
Bi!!

Kyle wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I would say exactly the opposite. It is acidity that makes wine an interesting drink. But only if it is ripe natural fruit acidity.
s.
Reply to
santiago

snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Very good point. I prefer wines with a good acidic balance especially when pairing with food. Without the acid component the wines are flabby and lack any interest.
Reply to
Bi!!

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